Feb5

Follow Me on Instagram

Social media presence is no longer an afterthought for companies and organizations. All brands from every industry have a presence across numerous social media platforms, and are actively interacting with their customers. So why is the healthcare industry behind the curve?

The biggest barrier to breakthrough into social media for healthcare companies seems to be patient privacy, aka HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act). Keeping patient information confidential proves to be difficult on social media platforms everyone can use. Additionally, the FDA requires fair balance in any post a company makes, meaning stating benefits with potential risks. This past summer, Kim Kardashian promoted a drug called Diclegis, used to treat morning sickness during pregnancy, on her Instagram account, and only stated the benefits of the product. The FDA immediately issued the drug company a warning by the FDA, and required it to take down the post, but not before nearly 46 million followers saw it.1

How are drug companies supposed to interact with their audience with such limited options and strict HIPAA regulations? The trick is education. Social media can be a great way to spread awareness about public health issues. Unique campaigns such as the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge went viral for this reason; 440 million people alone viewed thesevideos on Facebook.2 Because the Ice Bucket Challenge was an unbranded campaign determined to raise awareness of a disease, and not a promotion for a product, the organization avoided FDA regulations. Limiting self-promotion and focusing on ways to help your audience certainly takes away some of the barriers discussed earlier. Giving your audience key content can drive a brand home. Video tutorials on how to take a drug, product demos for medical devices, and infographics highlighting wellness tips are just a small sample of the endless possibilities to create meaningful content. Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, etc, can all be an endless hub of constantly updated information a consumer can use to become more aware of their condition, leading to a healthier life.

Though social media is not the definitive answer to improved patient engagement, it can easily become a major component in communicating with target audiences. Like most technology, social media is perpetually evolving, and should now be a required marketing tool for healthcare.

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Resources:

  1. Thomas M. Burton, The Wall Street Journal; “FDA Sends Warning Letter After Kim Kardashian Touts Morning-Sickness Drug”, viewed 2/3/2016; http://www.wsj.com/articles/fda-sends-warning-letter-after-kim-kardashian-touts-morning-sickness-drug-1439401985
  2. Ngan Ton, Mavrck; “The Social Media Statistics That Fueled The Biggest Topics of 2014”, viewed 2/3/2016; http://www.mavrck.co/social-media-statistics-that-fueled-the-biggest-topics-of-2014/
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Feb2

For Optimized Brand Strategies, Look to Market Research

brain_gears_on background_Who knew that Mark Twain, one of my favorite authors, knew a thing or two about market research? Proof is in one of his great quotes “Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please.”

That’s a comment on discipline, and it takes on a whole different—and cautionary—meaning when it’s applied to primary market research.

As a market researcher, my first order of business is to help clients “get the facts first.” The discipline of gathering the right facts from the right stakeholders―and in the right way at the right time, to boot―allows us to not only uncover our customer’s drivers and motivators, but also to help inspire changes in behavior.

There are certain activities and processes that are important for us, as an agency, to shepherd our clients through. For instance, we don’t want brand team members driving the creative according to their personal beliefs and perceptions about the product. Rather, we want our clients to clearly hear their customers’ voices, and shape their brand strategy accordingly, with our guidance.

As market researchers, we help ensure that clients “hear” their customers by answering 4 key questions:

1. What are the right facts?

  • The right facts can be as simple as the customer’s geography (physical location) and demography (age, gender, occupation, socioeconomic status), or as complex as their behavior (product consumption level, use patterns, frequency, and loyalty), and psychographic profile (interests, attitudes, and opinions)
  • By targeting the specific questions that our clients need to answer, and by understanding how that data are meant to inform business decisions, we determine the right facts to gather

2. Who are the right stakeholders?

  • Pharmaceutical clients often believe they have a “physician problem,” but chances are they could also have a patient, caregiver, payer, or pharmacist problem (And I could go on!). Sometimes it’s even more than one problem! Healthcare is a sector defined by intricate interdependencies among a long list of stakeholders that ultimately impact product usage
  • Well-designed market research takes into account all relevant stakeholders, including them as the research questions dictate. We often talk with clients about, at minimum, viewing patients, physicians, and payers as three legs supporting their product’s stool—the “length” (eg, importance) of those legs can vary by therapeutic area, but they all need to be taken into account when planning brand strategy

3. What is the right way to gather the facts given budgets and timelines?

  • Do we need one-on-one conversations with customers where we can take the time and latitude to investigate the “why’s” behind responses, and explore topics that might be challenging to articulate in front of others?
  • Do we need small groups of customers to talk with us about our clients’ products’ features and benefits, and the extent to which they produce functional, emotional, and/or personal benefits?
  • Do we need to use projective exercises in which ambiguous or vaguely defined stimuli grant customers’ considerable freedom in their responses? Images and metaphors can sometimes reveal a deeper dimension of thought/decision-making processes and feelings than objective, “correct” responses to explicit research questions
  • Do we need to survey a large number of customers, and on a big enough scale so we can obtain results that are statistically significant?
  • Do we need to survey various types of customers to understand the number and size of diverse market segments, including what those segments look like?
  • Do we need to deploy mobile or app-based methodologies that allow us to track customer thinking and behavior in real time?

4. When is the right time to gather the facts?

  • Sometimes we want to conduct research, either to take the market pulse on the heels of a significant marketplace event, or to get a “snapshot” of the market at a particular moment
  • Sometimes we want to be in the field when the market is quiet, so we can get a baseline against which to compare the impact of future disruptive events
  • Sometimes we want to longitudinally gather the same metrics from the same customers at certain intervals to get a long-term understanding of customer behavior and product usage
  • Sometimes we simply have materials or concepts to test. This might warrant multiple rounds of research, depending on customer response

Contrary to Mr. Twain’s memorable comment, the second order of business for market researchers is to make sure that clients do not distort those facts to fit their own view of their marketplace–or the marketplace they want instead of the one they have.

It’s therefore our job not just to provide the facts, but to give them meaning and to make actionable recommendations. The beauty of being part of the larger Ogilvy CommonHealth organization is that we have a wide and deep network of resources to help us round out our interpretation.

Drawing on our own backgrounds in multiple therapeutic areas, and working closely with our account team counterparts, optimizes our point of view on the research. Having our secondary research, data analytics, and digital colleagues weigh in allows us to ensure that our recommendations are deep and broad, and showcases our capabilities as an integrated agency.

Consider how primary market research can help your organization’s brand teams to get the right facts first (distortion-free!), and use that data as a platform on which to build robust strategies that firmly stake your brands’ positioning in the marketplace.

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Also posted in advertising, agency life, Branding, Clients, Data, Healthcare Communications, Marketing, Medical Education, Patient Communications, Research | Tagged | Comments closed
Dec22

Machines Learning Marketing

Self-driving cars, Facebook auto-tagging photos, Netflix recommendations, and targeted advertising—what do all of these have in common? These technologies have all undergone significant advancements in recent years due to an explosion of computing power and advancements in computer’s ability to learn, or “machine learning.”

While it sounds like a futuristic term, machine learning is the science of getting computers to act without being explicitly programmed. For example, let’s imagine a CRM program where data has been collected on customer’s interests, demographics, and engagement with previous campaigns. Based on previous interactions with customers, we can create predictions of how these customers will interact in future campaigns.

While the technology has existed for quite some time, significant advances in scale and computing power have allowed this technology to flourish. Companies including Amazon, Google, IBM, and Microsoft have all developed user-friendly machine-learning capabilities to complement their growing web service and cloud offerings. While some user interfaces are more intuitive than others, the goal is to allow users to upload data and allow the computer to extract valuable insights.

The marketing field is certainly taking notice. Marketers who have begun to use these technologies are asking questions such as, “What type of user will click on this ad?” or “How likely is this user to return to my site?” One popular use of the technology is to determine the probability that a user will respond to a direct mail or email. Based on previous information gathered and past user behavior, machine learning can identify who is most likely to engage in certain activities. Instead of blasting a direct mail out to 10,000 people blindly, we can really hone in on the users that we think are going to respond and customize a solution for them.

Another use is detection of click fraud in online advertising. Marketers certainly do not want to pay for 1,000 clicks when 980 of them are spam. While there can be numerous types of fraud, a computer can differentiate these types of spam and determine if a “real” person actually clicked on their ad. These technologies can realize significant savings for advertisers, and certainly distinguish advertising platforms and publishers.

Of course, there are still significant challenges to overcome. In the case of ad fraud detection, because click-through rates tend to be quite low, a significantly large amount of data is needed to accurately predict user action. Another issue is the growing complexity of these machine-learning models. As predictions tend to become more accurate, the complexity of how the computer arrives at an answer is increasingly unclear. Most recent machine learning algorithms have been labeled “black boxes,” as computers are performing millions of abstract calculations that are too vast for the user to analyze.

As machine learning solutions become user friendly and easy to implement, marketers should certainly start thinking of how they can apply machine learning to find new insights about their business.

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Also posted in Analytics, behavior change, CRM, Customer Relationship Marketing, Data, Design, Digital, Digital Advertising, Healthcare Communications, Marketing, Social Media, Statistics, Strategy | Comments closed
Nov30

Modernizing Healthcare Communications

Blog-Summit 160x160Remaining Relevant In an Age of Ubiquitous Information

Last month, Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide hosted our first marketing summit in collaboration with eConsultancy. This conference was initiated to bring healthcare leaders, marketers, and innovators together to discuss the changes that need to be made to build more effective patient communications. The summit showcased a massive well of talent, enthusiasm, and vision our industry has already in its ranks and a vision to deliver relevant healthcare information to patients and caregivers.

The Shackles of Our Own Making

Several years ago, healthcare marketing was years behind in its adoption of technology. Where many packaged goods brands had already adopted mobile, social, and eCommerce solutions, healthcare and pharmaceutical brands were still working with self-addressed postage solutions and print-your-own coupons for patients. Today, we are moving at a much faster pace, but there is still room for improvement.

Healthcare and pharmaceutical leaders are no longer trying “me-too” solutions to compete with consumer brands. We are now writing our own rules. Many brands are leveraging both the healthcare start-up culture and our “veteran” status to build strong partnerships for companies new to the space. We are also taking on the burden of regulation with a new vigor — by educating our teams and developing thought leadership around managing communities. We are also playing to our strengths and authority in disease categories and research. We are innovating in this landscape in spite of the burden of being “regulated brands.”

Digital is not separate

Digital is not a separate marketing platform. People don’t generally view experiences with their smartphone, TV, magazine, or desktop computer as unique “experiences” or “channels they engage.” They do see themselves as intelligently choosing the optimal channel to achieve a goal or move back and forth between mediums. This is normal, healthy, and a clear sign that these mediums and their users have matured. Its unfortunate that many clients and agencies compartmentalize their strategies and plans. Regardless of age, our patients are going to begin to question and express frustration as to why different channels have their own messaging, tone, and offers (in the case of coupons or reimbursement).

This is a pain point for the agency as well. If we are unable to unify our messagingand present a fully informed, multi-channel brand experience, we not be prepared to engage the next wave of the “digitally native” patient. We will also miss the opportunity to align the multi-generational conversation that will be more and more common as the digitally-centric children evolve into caregiver roles for the exploding baby boomer population. Our role as healthcare communicators is to unify channels and bring a channels agnostic message to our audience.

What is changing that model

There is a bright future ahead: Stimulus from the start-up community, a new type of self-educated patient, and a trend towards wellness in our culture are all fueling a new kind of healthcare marketing. This new perspective is focused on content and delivering a value that is rooted in supporting the patient with what pharmaceutical and healthcare brands can provide best — information about their products, the efficact of those products, and guidance to help patients manage their therapy through pharmaceuticals.

It may seem trite, but content is truly king. For brands looking to reach patients, content, when executed properly, is channel agnostic, portable, and scalable to every stakeholder in the chain of care. It is also something that can unify the phases of a patient journey and support a segmentation model for improved ROI of paid media

To not be lost amongst the WebMD’s, Dr. Oz’s, and patient influencers of the world, brand leadership needs to develop a vision for their brands. Specifically, a content strategy that will result in an “ownable” space that is the brand’s own and provides a strong foothold for patient interaction and discovery. From this place, brands can carve out a meaningful role in the patient’s journey that builds trust and provides a valued source of information about the product, disease state, and broader meaning to wellness in the patient’s life.

Changing the healthcare marketing model

The presenters at the Ogilvy CommonHealth Marketing Summit represent leadership from every facet of our industry. Each of them, from the perspectives of technology, content, company they work for, or patient service, all echoed the same refrain: The healthcare industry is at a pivot-point. Patients have access to a near infinite amount of information of varying degrees of utility. Our physician population is under new types of pressure to care for patients while managing group policies, provider requirements, mounting financial pressures, and patients equipped with massive amounts of their own data. Let these challenges be a call to action for marketers and content creators: Our focus needs to be building communications that are relevant to each phase of a physician’s journey and creating content based on the authority we have as drug manufacturers or brand management experts.

See more insights and opinions from the Ogilvy CommonHealth Marketing Summit at https://tagboard.com/OCHWWSUMMIT/245462?.

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Also posted in Branding, Creativity, Data, Digital, Digital Advertising, Health & Wellness, Healthcare Communications, Pharmaceutical, Social Media, Strategy | Tagged | Comments closed
Nov24

The Battle for the Inbox: Giving Your Email Campaign a Fighting Chance

Inbox_OverflowI don’t know about you, but my inbox is a war zone. I’m fighting a losing battle daily.

It is under constant barrage from companies, organizations, and campaigns that at one point I trusted enough to exchange my email address for a ride through their marketing funnel. However, for some of these companies, that trust was quickly eroded once I became bombarded by an endless barrage of uninteresting updates, overly aggressive offers, and endless e-begging for change. By the way, if anyone needs a coupon for Bed, Bath & Beyond, let me know. I can make it rain coupons.

But seriously, as a marketer, I understand and appreciate the ease in which email allows my brand message to be crafted, targeted, and scheduled exactly how I want and to whomever I want for only pennies a send. It’s magical. However, marketers also have to understand that our job is far from over once we hit send. Our email is now just one drop in a tidal wave of emails, making it look less like the carefully crafted brand message chocked full of utility that we intended it to be, and more like a groaning zombie in a mob of other groaning zombies with one single-minded purpose, to eat your brains. And by brains, I mean your attention.

Earlier this year, a study released by the National Center for Biotechnology Information noted that the average human attention span dropped from 12 seconds in the year 2000 to 8 seconds in 2015, which as the study noted, is 1 second shorter than that of a goldfish. No shock there. Humans have a lot going on. We have emails to delete, zombies to kill, etc. What do goldfish have going on? Exactly.

As marketers, we know that we have a fraction of a second to pique our audience’s interest before our email’s fate is determined with a single swipe (no pressure). With so many messages competing for those 8 seconds of attention, your email is going to need a little help.

To give our email campaign a fighting chance at relevancy, we need to ensure we’re effectively communicating our brand’s value to our audience. We must first ensure that we’ve employed a sound segmentation methodology that groups targets by quantifiable value metrics. Depending on campaign objectives and visibility into the audience data, we may determine that value is measured by the audience’s likeliness to respond, say from previous responses, or their projected business impact.

We also want to ensure that we’re measuring success with metrics that actually matter. Oh sure, we might glance over our post-campaign email report to see some double-digit open rate and some non-zero click-through rate and conclude that we just did marketing. But why stop there? Email open and click-through rates alone only provide clues, not insights. In addition, these metrics can be misleading, as they are often over- or under-reported due to different email settings. For example, aggressive spam filters may activate links within an email prior to it reaching an inbox to determine if the links contain malicious content, which is usually reported as an email open.

So instead of just scratching the surface, why not look to understand how well your campaign did at driving the desired on-site responses that it intended? By designating a hierarchy of desired on-site actions and tracking our campaign to those actions, we can begin to see a much clearer picture. From here we should be able to make some strong assumptions about why actions were taken or not taken on our site and prioritize areas of focus in order to get better results in future iterations. Did our message properly communicate utility? Was there enough of a value tradeoff for our audience to take a desired action? Was the right message targeting the right people?

Now we’re getting somewhere. We now know that we sent this message to these people and this percent performed at least one of our desired actions on the site. Knowing things is cool. But as we are reminded by the great philosopher, GI Joe, this is only half the battle. Although I can’t recall GI Joe ever actually revealing what the other half of the battle was, I think it’s safe to assume that the other half of the battle is “doing.”

So what actions can we take to bring our performance to the next level? Based on what we know about how our segmented email audience responded to our recent email, we can begin to formulate and test some additional hypotheses using A/B split testing. One thing to note here is that we must ensure that we have a cohesive testing framework in place where our tests are driven by our hypotheses about our audience segments and those tests must prove or disprove those hypotheses.

After the conclusion of our tests, we should have answered some of our burning questions about our audience, which we will then use as insights we can apply in other areas of the campaign in future communications. Insights such as: people may not want to be e-stalked with daily branded emails. Who knew?

At the end of the day, we’re seeking to change behavior by providing value to our audience in the quality and relevance of our communications. Force-feeding our brand’s message will likely end with a quick swipe to the Deleted folder, or worse, on the unsubscribe list. Your campaign deserves better than that.

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Also posted in Analytics, Branding, Data, Digital, Digital Advertising, Strategy, Technology | Tagged | Comments closed
Nov11

Social media: does it affect our mental health?

Social media does it affect our mental health 195x130Can you remember the days before DM, hashtags and emojis? When we had to call our friends on their landlines to arrange when and where to meet, hoping they would arrive at the right time and right place?

It’s hard to believe that 10 years ago Facebook had only just been founded and Twitter hadn’t even launched, and yet social media is now an established phenomenon that most of us can’t imagine living without.

The wonder of social media has benefited modern society greatly and revolutionised the way we communicate. On the surface, these platforms may seem harmless but in reality, some research has found that they may actually be detrimental to our mental wellbeing. On the flip side, social media can provide people living with mental health problems a platform to communicate freely and connect with others who can provide support.

So should we be limiting our use of social media for a better quality of life, or is it actually providing some with a much-needed outlet? We hosted a panel discussion at Social Media Week in London, where experts shared their insights on this very topic.

An interesting theme that was raised during the discussion was personal identity and the effect that social media has on how people regard their place in the world and define themselves. Dr Linda Papadopoulos, a psychologist, revealed that nowadays it’s not just the people we know who help to shape our identity—having an online profile means that validation can come from complete strangers with no real vested interest in us. This constant feeling of being assessed by others can have a negative effect on our mental health and make us want to always make a good impression, even to those who don’t know us.

Another thought-provoking point that was highlighted, by the panellist and blogger Mark Brown, was that having immediate access to carefully crafted selfies means that we are the first generation to know exactly what we look like and how we come across to strangers at all times. More and more we are presenting ourselves as near to perfect as possible, but the truth is that we don’t always know what’s going on behind a filtered online persona. Stories that we see in the media about suicide that link to the use of social media highlight that a self-curated online identity can so easily conceal the saddening reality.

While there were discussions around the negative effects that social media can have on our lives, Chris Cox, Communications Director at Mind, emphasised how social media forums, such as Elefriends, provide platforms for people to communicate freely about their condition. They also give people an opportunity to connect with others who can relate to them or who can provide comfort and counsel.

So is social media a good or bad thing for mental health? Because social media is such a new and emerging area, it’s difficult to say at this point, but what is clear is that, used in the right way, it can be a valuable resource that exposes us to information and people who we would have never been able to access before. As our panel concluded, social media is neither good nor bad; it’s a tool to amplify the voice of the people.

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Also posted in behavior change, content marketing, Creativity, Culture, Design, Digital, Digital Advertising, Health & Wellness, Healthcare Communications, Media, Mental Health, Social Media, Strategy | Comments closed
Nov4

I’m excited about the new Facebook Search!

Facebook Search

The new Facebook Search feature is a pretty robust tool that we should be excited about as both marketers and users. Here are a few thoughts, as well as a few predictions around where Facebook might be going with this.

As a regular Facebook user, I was really impressed by the amount of content I was served up when I did a simple search for “cough.” The results were divided into three buckets: Pages, Friends and Groups, and Public Posts – and the keyword was highlighted in each of the posts. There is also a sub-navigation that lets users filter results by Top, Latest, Photos, Videos, Places, and even Apps and Events. Having immediate access to relevant posts that were outside my network was really refreshing, and it was cool to see who was talking about coughs within my network specifically. It will be interesting to see how the results will update during a political event or a big game. In many ways, it reminds me of the way current events can be followed on Twitter.

For users who have privacy concerns, this new feature should raise red flags. Facebook provides users with privacy settings in the actual post window that allow them to choose who can view their post. Those rules will continue to hold true within the search results. If your post is only visible to your friends, then it would only appear in the search results of users in your immediate network. If it is a public post, it will be visible outside of your network. The same applies to comments on posts, as well.

As marketers, we should be excited about the role that brands can play within this new space. Since this is new to all of us, we don’t yet understand the rhyme or reason behind the order of the posts that are displayed when a user searches. That being said, this is a great opportunity for brands to ensure their social engagement strategy is buttoned up. Brands need to be ultra-focused on creating relevant content on their feeds that is keyword-rich, and that includes image and video descriptions.

It will be a matter of time before we are able to advertise in this space. Like Google, media buys will likely dictate your brand’s rank within the search results in the Pages section, with native advertising appearing throughout the Public Posts. When we factor in the Buy Products feature, it’s easy to see how Facebook can begin to position itself as a direct competitor to Google and Amazon, although I think that’s still some ways away.

Visit http://search.fb.com/ to hear all about it from the proverbial horse’s mouth.

This article was originally posted on Ivan Ruiz Graphic & Web Design.

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Also posted in advertising, Analytics, Branding, Creativity, Data, Design, Digital, Digital Advertising, Health & Wellness, Healthcare Communications, Media, Media Placement, Physician Communications, Social Media, Strategy, Technology | Comments closed
Oct9

Analytics, With a Side of Bacon

Bacon BlogKnowledge is power. We’ve all heard it. Maybe we’ve heard it too much, to the point where the message, the value and…well, the power of that statement is not truly appreciated, especially in the data-rich world we live in today.

While variations of the expression above have been around for thousands of years, the core message is most often attributed to Francis Bacon, an English philosopher born in the 16th century.1 Bacon’s use of the phrase was actually in an essay on religion; however, the saying has since been adopted as a motivational and inspirational catchphrase for parents, teachers, and, of course, business professionals. Specific to our cause, we will address marketing professionals.

In today’s marketing environment, knowledge—and the subsequent power that’s derived from it—are rooted in analytics and data-driven decision-making. You might say the message has evolved to:

data=knowledge,  knowledge=power, DATA=POWER

Successful decision-makers and key influencers—strategists, account leads, media planners, CMOs, CADs (Chief Acronym DuJour)—embody the spirit of that data-to-power relationship. These stakeholders work hand in hand with analytics folks and embrace the culture of utilizing the vast amount of data that’s available today toward making smarter marketing decisions. We need to constantly evaluate key business questions using supporting data to shape those decisions—questions such as:

  • What does my audience look like? (target size, buying habits, demographic)
  • Where is my audience? (channel preference, geo-targeting)
  • How much of my audience can I expect to convert? (predictive analysis)
  • What content is resonating with my audience? (path flow, engagement analysis, social shares)
  • What is the relevant message for my audience? (media performance analysis
  • & optimization)
    When are the best times to communicate with my audience? (dayparting implementation & analysis)
  • Why is Bacon so awesome? (no analysis required; some things we just accept)

So we’re back to the bacon? Sort of, but before we get to the food product, let’s jump back to Francis and his statement. Knowledge is definitely power, and data can drive that knowledge. Analytics should be the fuel constantly feeding the marketing engine.

Yes, you can make the case that Mr. Bacon’s expression has been overcooked (and who likes their bacon overcooked?). You can also make the case that data analysis can be overcooked as well. Let’s be honest, either too much data analysis or too much bacon can produce undesirable intestinal reactions. But with the right amount at the right time? It’s a home run.

To take it a step further, you can go to Denny’s and order pancakes, hash browns and eggs—but to truly make it a Grand Slam, you need the bacon! Just ask your friendly analytics server; they’ll set you up.

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1. David Simpson, DePaul University; “Francis Bacon (1561-1626)”, Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy – A Peer Reviewed Academic Resource [n.d]; viewed 8/28/2015; http://www.iep.utm.edu/bacon/

 

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Aug21

Helping Clients Navigate Compliant Communications for FDA-regulated Products

Helping Clients Navigate Compliant Communications for FDA-regulated Products IMAGE_EDVANITY URLS: Google Paid Search Engine Marketing (SEM) Changes
• Redirecting ad changes effective January 12, 2016
• Prohibiting ads where vanity URLs are utilized and dramatically different from the destination URL

Google has announced significant changes in their paid search engine advertising policies with regard to pharmaceutical products. The change that we are addressing here deals with vanity URLs, and their respective redirecting ads, that will take place in January 2016. The bottom line is that Google will no longer allow vanity URLs in an effort to provide consumers with more “clarity and transparency.”

Google has a long-standing policy prohibiting any ads where the destination URL differs dramatically from the display URL. Please note, this prohibition is not exclusively for pharmaceutical products—it has been Google’s practice across the board. Up until now, the pharmaceutical industry had been the exception to the rule. The reason for the exception was because in many cases, information seekers will not know the name of a drug, but will understand and know the symptoms/disease state information.

FDA background information
Previously, the FDA never objected to marketers utilizing vanity URLs and/or redirecting ads. These URLs/ads typically do not directly promote the name of a prescription product. Instead they lend themselves more to a disease state or descriptive nature, and then redirect users to another location or URL where they will see branded information specific to the prescription drug and/or disease state. Vanity URLs/redirecting ads are not exclusive to online SEM use, and are also used in print ads, television commercials, billboards, postcards, and more.
In March 2009, the FDA sent out 14 violation letters regarding search engine marketing practices of 48 brands. Thirteen of those violations referred to SEM ads running on Google. The FDA noted four types of violations in 2009:

  1. Omission of risk information, failure to meet requirements of 21 CRF 202.1(e)(5)(ii)
  2. Inadequate communication of indication
  3. Overstatement of efficacy
  4. Failure to use the required established name

Google’s reaction—what exactly is Google implementing?
Beginning in January 2016, Google will not permit pharmaceutical advertisers to have vanity URLs (such as “TreatmentforConditionX.com”) that redirect users to a BrandName.com website.

Pharmaceutical marketers will have the following options for vanity URLs:
Option 1

ConditionSymptomsGoogle-01

Sample ad showing company name as URL

Option 2
They can add “.com” to the company name.

ConditionSymptomsGoogle-02

Sample ad showing company name plus .com as URL

Option 3a (for prescription drugs, biologics, and vaccines)
They can display the phrase “Prescription treatment website” as the display URL.

ConditionSymptomsGoogle-03

Sample ad showing prescription treatment display URL

Option 3b (for medical devices)
They can display the phrase “Prescription device website” as the display URL.

ConditionSymptomsGoogle-04

Sample ad showing device display URL

All of these ads will be able to drive to pages on the brand.com or brandhcp.com website.

At the present time, this change has been instituted by Google only, and doesn’t lend itself to print, television, or other advertising mediums.

What does this mean for our clients?
Review and reassessment of live and proposed Google SEM campaigns where clients utilize vanity URLs need to be completed as soon as possible. New campaigns need to take these new rules into consideration during the tactical planning phase. Funds can be shifted to Yahoo and Bing, however there is the possibility that they may also follow suit.

Google has indicated a willingness to work with pharmaceutical clients to minimize potential negative impact to paid search campaign performance. Testing of the new formats will determine which type of units work best with various campaigns.

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Jul2

Does Size Always Matter?

How Pharma Engages With Its Followers Online

Social Network Blog Image_EDPharma is investing more heavily in social media than ever before; tweets are up 530% since 2013 and Twitter followers have increased by nearly 300%. So far, so good. Because more followers means more opportunities to get involved, and the more impact you make online, right?

But engaging in genuine, meaningful conversations about a corporate brand isn’t easy, and it’s important to ensure we don’t fall into the trap of focusing too much on numbers and not enough on engagement. Companies need to ensure they don’t build followers just to push out messages to anyone willing to pay attention. While people are increasingly more open to finding new knowledge on social media, they don’t want to wade through hundreds of pages of information, images or tweets to do so.

The balance between community size versus engagement is becoming more and more of a priority, and formed one of the focus areas for a recent report published by Ogilvy Healthworld, part of Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide (the health behavior specialists of Ogilvy & Mather).The report, Connecting the Dots: Which Pharma Companies Are Succeeding in the Social Media Space?, was the first of its kind to provide insights into which pharma companies are leading the way in integrated social media marketing strategies.

“We know that some pharma companies have been cautious in their approach to social media, but our report clearly demonstrates a dramatic and successful increase in activity,” said Rebecca Canvin, Social Media Manager at Ogilvy Healthworld, adding: “Social media has changed the way pharma companies communicate—it allows them to build corporate reputation and engage in genuine, meaningful conversations with audiences. For companies who want to stand out from the crowd, it’s time to be brave, get personal, educate and integrate social media into their wider marketing strategy.”

Interestingly, companies that ranked most highly in the audit weren’t necessarily those with the largest communities, but those who engaged their audiences through frequent activity. And it’s not hard to understand why the more active companies enjoy the most engagement with their followers—after all, social media in its very nature demands participation and interaction. But the companies that do it well manage to create content that is less about the organization and more about connection points or interests that followers share.

The report highlights that although the focus for pharma companies is still on building brand profile, the priority is turning to attracting, keeping and engaging with loyal followers. And to do this, the onus needs to shift to “quality over quantity.” It’s more powerful to engage with a small group of passionate followers, whether they’re consumers, doctors or media, than to blast one message to 10,000 followers and “see what sticks.”

And loyal followers will reward companies who engage continuously in this way—so really, shouldn’t we all be asking, how much does size matter?

Connecting the dots - infographic UK Post

To find out more on Connecting the Dots: Which Pharma Companies Are Succeeding in the Social Media Space? please visit: http://bit.ly/1P5R5Ws

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