Sep23

Access to High-Cost Medications: A Balancing Act

UKBlogImageSmallAs continuing innovation moves us further toward personalized healthcare and the development of targeted treatments, how can patients across Europe ensure they have fair access to high-cost medications?

Securing reimbursement remains one of the biggest challenges to delivering market access for new treatments. The debate around balancing tight health budgets with fair access for patients is shaping the way governments and payers respond to these advancements. Cancer treatments are a specific concern, especially those designed to target rare and aggressive cancers, and as such have a particularly high development cost per patient.

So what’s the way forward?

This was the question posed by the Ogilvy Healthworld UK Market Access team earlier this summer when we brought together a panel of leading experts in front of an audience of industry figures, academics and patient representatives.

The panelists discussed the issue from the viewpoint of each of the 4P’s of healthcare—payers, prescribers, policymakers and patients—to chart out the future course of reimbursement.

What was the outcome?

After a far-ranging debate, five key ideas stood out as important for taking the conversation on the introduction of high-cost medicine ahead:

1. While schemes like the UK Cancer Drugs Fund have been a success, they may prove unsustainable in the long term. New systems to assess and support the uptake of new treatments must be a national priority.

2. Three key areas that will affect the cost of medication over the next decade are:

– Technological development; as new innovations make treatments more expensive, not cheaper

– How care is delivered; and potential cost-savings that can be made in reforming healthcare systems

– Whether health systems can reform the way that healthcare is funded to support uptake of new technology

3. New treatments will not necessarily lead to cost-efficiencies, but rather higher costs for payers. This means that demand and pricing must be controlled to maintain a healthy balance between supporting innovation and ensuring access to new medicines for patients.

4. Current value assessments are too narrow and need to be reformed to better reflect their full value. As newer medicines that raise costs are developed, a more complex assessment model will be necessary to ensure that their total cost/ benefit to the healthcare system can be successfully mapped.

5. If payers are to be able to afford new high-cost medicines, cost-efficiencies must be found in the delivery of services. Although healthcare systems should remain a center of healthcare delivery across Europe, it was agreed that the way they operate must fundamentally change to provide care in the most effective way possible. This should be focused on reducing hospital visits and supporting “community-based care” systems.

 

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Aug27

Isn’t Patient Centricity What Pharma Has Been Doing for Years?

TinaWoodsGraphic2Patient centricity is the new buzzword. Most of our pharma clients have patients at the heart of their corporate vision and mission, and say that the patient voice drives everything that they do. But what does it really mean to be truly patient centric?

At the recent EyeforPharma Patient Summit in London, there was a lot of talk on organising companies around patients rather than brands. And this is not surprising given that a true understanding of patients’ day-to-day needs and how they behave in the real world, as opposed to trial conditions, is critical to developing successful new products over the long term.

As digital channels, including mobile and social media, continue to democratise communication networks, pharma cannot afford to pay lip service to the increasingly powerful patient voice. They need to get used to the idea of patient opinion leaders shaping the future via patient-driven networks. For example, developing patient champions who will talk about their illness will be essential in establishing disease awareness.

The notion of supported self-management and how pharma should/could be involved is a hot topic. It is important to develop integrated, personalised patient support programmes to facilitate quality interaction between patients and stakeholders (including caregivers and family members) along the patient journey. The goal should be to provide innovative solutions around patient needs and wants—to deliver an improved patient experience, addressing patients’ individual beliefs, behaviours and goals as they are on their personal and emotional journey.

Meaningful patient insight is at the heart of any patient-centric strategy. Understanding the lived patient experience, “walking in the patients’ shoes,” is the key to deriving these insights. Anything else is just observation. Unless they have been patients themselves, even healthcare professionals are merely observers and cannot truly understand the lived patient experience.

True patient centricity is in the process of being defined, not by pharma, nor by healthcare professionals, but by the patients themselves. Is it any wonder that people are saying that “true patient engagement is the blockbuster drug of the century”?

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Jun18

The Movement Toward “Pill Plus”

extramileHistorically, the relationship between manufacturers and payers has been transactional in nature. Payers needed to work with many manufacturers to meet financial objectives. With markets like hypertension and cholesterol at their prime and filled with branded agents, contracts benefiting both parties were the No. 1 priority. The majority of the discussions were branded, and there was a lack of trust and transparency between parties.

That was the old world, however—and this is the new world.

In today’s healthcare market, manufacturers and payers are dependent upon each other to meet their business goals. More focus has been placed on “above brand” or “pill plus” initiatives, over and above rebates for contracted products, resulting in a more collaborative environment among stakeholders. Contracts and transactions are no longer the only indicator of a positive relationship.

This shift was due in part to market trends that have required pharmaceutical manufacturers to step up their game. They needed to move beyond a transactional relationship in order to continue to provide value and differentiate themselves and their portfolios from the competition. Because there is such a huge generic market satisfying the needs of many patients with chronic illnesses, payers are relying less on their manufacturer partners to satisfy their formularies. Such market trends include:

  • Genericization of pharmaceutical marketplace
  • New branded agents with marginal improvement over existing therapies
  • Introduction of expensive orphan and specialty products
  • Access to payers and providers being minimized as stakeholders consolidate

This new environmental dynamic presents a great opportunity for our clients to take it up a notch…and where there is opportunity for our clients, there is opportunity for us. It is becoming increasingly important for us to approach tactical planning in a different way. So…what should our clients be doing to reserve a seat at the “pill plus” table?

  • Improve quality of care—focus on patient engagement, care coordination, quality measures, and optimizing the patient experience
  • Provide real world outcomes that demonstrate the value of therapies
  • Focus on developing deeper, more meaningful relationships with payer customers by providing added value through above-brand programs

So, you see, pharma must raise the bar—they must adapt to sustain value over time…because “if you’re not at the table, you’re on the plate.”

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May29

A Patient is a Virtue

sales reps and docsIn the age of WebMD, Everyday Health, and Facebook, consumers are more informed and involved in their health than ever before.  And with social media infiltrating every aspect of their lives, they are now more vocal than ever.  Patients can – and in most cases are willing to – tell you what you want to know about your brand.  Just ask…and listen.  So why is it that some brands fail to take full advantage of tapping into their own customers for insight, ideas, and even inspiration?

We’ve all heard the phrase “typical pharma ad” and as an industry we are guilty of producing far too much of it.  Sometimes it’s driven by regulatory conservatism.  Often it’s a stubborn client who is afraid to push the envelope, while at other times there just isn’t enough budget to upset the status quo.  So we’re forced to pick up some stock photography, reach into our bag of preapproved claims, slap the all-important “pharma swoosh” on the piece, and call it a day.

But is the work resonating with patients?  Is it even being noticed by patients?  In order to make a connection with patients, the marketing needs to tap into what drives them, what worries them, and what will help them take the desired action.  Put simply, they need to see themselves in the marketing.

Market research and reports can obviously give you broad-stroke generalizations about your audience.  But how can you dive deeper into the psyche of your patients?  There are numerous ways you can do this and they don’t require significant investments:

·         Develop and leverage a standing Patient Advisory Board – Recruit patients to participate in an advisory board…and use it!  This is a great channel for bouncing ideas off patients and hearing first-hand about the challenges they face with their condition every day.  These boards can be conducted virtually (although at least one face-to-face meeting a year helps build camaraderie).  Also, be sure to refresh the participants so that you continually get the latest perspectives.

·         Seek input from stakeholders outside of the Brand Team – The Brand Team can sometimes be the furthest removed from the patient base, as they can get bogged down with sales reports and budget meetings; so try to engage those on the front line.  Sales reps often can provide direct feedback from HCPs and office staff on what they see in patients.  Is there an 800 number for you brand?  If so, speak with the customer service reps who field those calls.  What issues do they hear about most often and what questions are they asked most frequently?

·         Establish a patient eCRM program – A CRM program can be simple or complex – but in order to be useful, it must be trackable.  From that you can see firsthand what content is looked at most often and therefore assumed to be of most relevance.  You can also conduct quick surveys or online polls to get insight about your target.

·         Attend events and conferences – Again, this is another opportunity to hear from those on the front line: sales reps, patients, and HCPs.  You can also see, in one fell swoop, what the competition is doing to market themselves.

Nothing I’ve suggested is earth-shattering or groundbreaking, but I do find that these often get overlooked in favor of more complicated (and costly) research.  I happen to work on a well-established drug that was first-to-market in a category that is now undergoing seismic changes.  We needed to defend our turf from new therapies, new dosing formulations, and new administration devices, and we needed to do it with a limited budget.  “Gaining new patients was going to be increasingly difficult,” we thought, “so let’s at least be sure to hold on to the ones we have.”

So we set out last year to develop a campaign unlike anything this brand has seen in its 20+ years of existence.  We needed to reinvent ourselves while remaining true to our heritage and what kept us successful all these years.  We employed all of the tactics I mentioned above to help us paint a clear and vibrant picture of who our patients – our very lifeline – were.  What we learned was that our old marketing reflected misconceptions about what people with this condition were “supposed” to be like.  In no way did we reflect their vibrancy, defiance, and zest for living.  And because of that, our patients felt like the brand was letting them down.  How could we expect them to be advocates for the brand if we weren’t living up to our end of the deal?

The new campaign has just recently launched, so I can’t tell you yet how successful we’ve been at defending our turf.  But what I can say is that the feedback from patients, sales reps and HCPs alike has been overwhelmingly positive.  It is bold and defiant, and goes beyond the standard “talk to your doctor about…” with a rallying cry that conveys our patients’ inner strength.  In other words, it is a clear reflection of them.

So if your brand feels like it’s stagnating or worse yet, losing relevance, don’t panic.  Put your ear to the ground and listen for the voice of the patient – and then make sure it comes through in the work.

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Also posted in Branding, Creativity, CRM, Data, Efficacy, Great Ideas, Health & Wellness, Healthcare Communications, Learning, Marketing, Strategy | Tagged , , , , | Comments closed
May20

Bringing Sexy Back…to Science

disease managementThank God for The Big Bang Theory. They’ve made it cool to be a nerd again.

While traditional brand attributes (efficacy, safety, dosing, etc) will always be of key importance, the last few years have seen a renaissance of scientific enlightenment as physicians across disciplines take a closer look at not only how well a drug works, but why it works.

With the advent of new targeted agents in oncology and virology, mechanism of action quickly went from a dirty little secret buried in the PI to front page news. There are now numerous products that have built their entire value proposition on mechanism of action.

In oncology in particular, where clinical improvement between new and old drugs is often measured in teaspoons, the science behind the brand can often stand as a key differentiator. Avastin—one of the most successful drugs in oncology—created a simple scientific rationale for its use: stop cancer cells from creating new blood vessels and “starve the tumor.” With three simple words they took a complex process of tumor growth and development and created a unique opportunity in oncology that they have effectively owned since its launch in 2004.

Science Sells

The ongoing race toward “scientific innovation” is redefining how we market specialty brands.

  • Have a good pick-up line: In specialty marketing an entirely new nomenclature has spawned, significantly impacting our ability to change physicians’ perceptions of our brand. Simple terms to describe the science have now become synonymous with clinical attributes we could otherwise never say in a branded way. “Targeted” or “selective” now means safe and well-tolerated, “multi-functional” equals efficacious. Understanding how one simple word can affect how physicians view your brand is now key, requiring comprehensive research and knowledge of the market.
  • Be yourself and if that doesn’t work be someone better: No longer content to be classified under traditional terms, products have been using science to create entire “new” drug classes. Avastin rebranded themselves from a VEGF inhibitor to an “anti-angiogenic,” and DDP-4 was redefined as an “incretin degradation inhibitor” in type 2 diabetes.
  • Dress to impress: Where once MOA materials were simply required to be informative, now visually dynamic and digitally distinct tactical initiatives have quickly become a cost of entry for products seeking to separate themselves from the competition.

And while I can say with absolute certainty that an in-depth knowledge of molecular drivers of cancer will not help you talk to girls at parties, understanding the science behind the brands and their competitors is now crucial to opening up new doors for creative exploration, messaging and differentiation in specialty marketing.

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Also posted in behavior change, Content Strategy, copywriting, Creativity, Data, Efficacy, Healthcare Communications, Learning, Marketing, Medicine, Physician Communications, positioning, Science, Strategy | Tagged , , , , , | Comments closed
May14

Social Media for Pharma?

stethoscope social mediaHave you been looking for a way for your brand to engage in social media? Are you unsure of what the draft FDA guidance on social media means? Looking for some tips to help get you started? If so, you’re in the right place.

Social media has been an integral part of the digital marketer’s toolbox for several years. It is especially useful for driving brand awareness and generating site traffic. Unfortunately, due to the tightly regulated nature of the pharmaceutical industry, many have been reluctant to implement social media campaigns. Brand marketers have avoided them due to a lack of clear guidance from the FDA, and medical/regulatory review teams have refused to approve social campaigns due to the fear of receiving a dreaded FDA letter.

With the release of draft guidelines by the FDA in January, our industry has been provided with long-awaited parameters. Final guidelines have yet to be issued, but this is a step in the right direction. Slowly, pharmaceutical marketers are dipping their toes in the water. Here is a quick overview of the FDA’s guidance:

  • Brands are responsible for monitoring the content they publish. Content that is repurposed, posted, or used in an inappropriate way is not the responsibility of the pharmaceutical company (as long as the individual repurposing the content is not employed by the pharmaceutical company).
  • Pharmaceutical companies are not responsible for content published by associations and other partners that it provides with financial support (eg, unrestricted educational grants). Content and assets provided are the responsibility of the pharmaceutical company and must still go through typical FDA sampling.
  • Pharmaceutical companies and their representatives must clearly identify their association with brands when participating in conversations.
  • Fair balance is still in full effect. As with any other promotional medium, claims must be counterbalanced with the risks of the drug.
  • FDA submissions of interactions do not have to be submitted in real-time. Conversations that take place can be sampled after the fact to keep brands in compliance.

You can access the full document here.

Feeling more comfortable with the guidelines? Are you ready to deploy a social media campaign? Here are some tips to get you started:

  • Start with a strategy. As obvious as this seems, people are so anxious to implement a social media campaign, they dive in headfirst. Ensure you identify the goal of your campaign so you can measure the results of your efforts.
  • Engage in conversations with your audience. People use social media to connect with people, rarely with brands. Talk to them about topics that matter to them and are appropriately linked to your brand (eg, an antidepressant sponsoring a support forum providing tips to patients and caregivers on ways to remain positive and the importance of adherence).

According to a 2012 channel preferences research report published by ExactTarget, Facebook and Twitter rank at the bottom (4% and 1%, respectively) of channels participants want used for promotional messaging. This accentuates the importance of finding a healthy balance between brand promotion and human interaction. You can access the research here.

  • Messages must be relevant and fresh. They must take into account the context, location and intention of your audience. Not every opportunity that arises to share your marketing message should be taken. Selectivity is part of the secret to success.
  • Be flexible. The future is unpredictable. For brands to thrive in social media, they must be ready to act in the blink of an eye. Editorial calendars should not be set in stone.
  • Listen closely to the feedback of your audience and take action. The most insignificant of posts can take on a life of its own, leaving marketers scrambling to control the fallout.
  • Always have a social media crisis plan in place. Sitting idly by and not taking action is tantamount to brand suicide. Does anyone remember #mcdstories, #askJPM or #myNYPD? If not, hop on Twitter and search for the aforementioned hashtags. All are examples of hashtags that turned into “bashtags” and left their respective marketing agencies scratching their heads and scrambling to minimize the damage.

Although the pharmaceutical industry is heavily regulated, social media is an opportunity to connect with your audience and should not be overlooked. With the draft FDA guidelines in hand and a sound strategy, you can now connect with consumers through social media.

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May1

Oncologists to Initiate Discussion Around Value

money stethoscopeEarlier this month a new initiative was announced to encourage oncologists to discuss the price and relative value of cancer medicines with their patients. No, this was not driven by executive fiat as part of the ACA, nor is it the brainchild of an insurance carrier. Instead, it comes from the American Society of Clinical Oncologists, or ASCO, the professional organization for oncologists and publisher of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, among other titles.

ASCO has formed working groups that will weigh efficacy, side effects and price to help better define the value of oncology medicines. Initially these groups will look at treatments for advanced lung and prostate cancer and for multiple myeloma, said Richard Schilsky, the group’s chief medical officer.

This comes a little less than a year after Scott Ramsey from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle published a study suggesting that individuals with a cancer diagnosis were 2.5 times more likely to file for bankruptcy compared to a matched control group.

Not unlike hepatitis C, the price of therapy in oncology is a hot topic, as 11 of the 12 cancer drugs approved by the FDA in 2012 were priced at more than $100,000 per year.

To date, ASCO and another group, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), have published treatment guidelines that payers use as the basis for reimbursement coverage of cancer drugs, but these guidelines have been value-agnostic, meaning the price of the drug has had little or nothing to do with strong category recommendations. ASCO’s move could change this.

So how could this impact our clients’ business?

·         Pharma has traditionally had to defend ultra-premium pricing only to payers, who, in many cases, were/are legally obligated to cover the costs, at least for Medicare/Medicaid patients.  Broadening this conversation to include HCPs and patients could affect overall product positioning, messaging and channel strategy.

·         Manufacturers need to rethink how they approach the value section of the AMCP dossier as they submit these to payers as the way payers (public or private) are assessing value will change.  The dossier must also be consistent with value messages to non-payer audiences.

·         With compensation models for oncologists already shifting from “buy and bill” to “pay for quality,” these ASCO value ratings could further aid in the rapid adoption of biosimilars and generic targeted small molecules that will begin hitting the market in the next few years.

·         To the ire of many payers, pharma has been able to mitigate some financial barriers to obtaining therapy through the use of co-pay cards and other assistance programs. If the conversation turns from out-of-pocket costs to “costs to society,” demonstrating meaningful value will be of paramount importance to brands.

·         Dialogue studies in this category suggest sometimes broken dialogue between HCPs, cancer patients, and their caregivers. Layering on a discussion about the value of a drug could add to the confusion. As oncologists experiment with this new value lexicon, it could create an opportunity for brands to take a leadership role in framing the value discussion.

Historically in the US, positioning a drug on “value” has been akin to admitting your brand does not offer a meaningful advantage over existing therapy options. Will this nascent movement result in opportunities for value-based oncology brands? Only time will tell, but in the meantime rethinking how we articulate value is more important than ever.

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Apr22

Pharmacists — New Agents of Change for Improved Healthcare Delivery?

pharmacist and customerIt is becoming increasingly common to encounter new outlets for healthcare delivery within retail pharmacies, big box stores, supermarkets, etc. This phenomenon is not occurring by happenstance. We often hear there is a growing shortage of physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals. Now, this shortage is likely to be magnified by the large number of newly insured patients entering the market as a result of the Affordable Care Act. These patients will need new places to seek care and new types of healthcare professionals to care for them.

One site of care that is becoming an increasingly attractive destination for patients is the retail clinic, due to the convenience and quality of service for basic healthcare needs. When we examine the average cost of a minor illness visit across different sites of care, we see that retail clinics provide a viable and cost-effective alternative:

  • Retail clinic: $76
  • Physician visit: $120
  • Urgent care: $121
  • Emergency room: $499

Given the reduced burden on the system, we can expect that healthcare delivery will continue to migrate outside of traditional physician and hospital channels, to non-traditional, lower-cost venues like retail clinics. In fact, the number of retail clinics is estimated to grow 25% to 30% annually to almost 2,900 by 2015. But who is primarily responsible for providing care in these locations?

Most often it is pharmacists who play a very active role in delivering care. They have expanded their role beyond drug dispensing to include medication reviews, providing education materials, administering vaccinations, and more.  Furthermore, they are well-positioned to continue to expand their influence on patient care.

As marketers, we should closely examine the potential role pharmacy could play to improve the quality and cost efficiency of healthcare delivery. As one of the key patient-facing allied healthcare professionals, they should be supported with education and tools that go far beyond their traditional focus on drug dosing and dispensing. Pharmacists have training and access to data that uniquely position them to help improve the patient’s journey from the first prescription after diagnosis, through ongoing adherent treatment, to chronic disease management and/or recovery.

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Mar11

SXSW 2014: Technology and Health

SXSW_Logo_2013_BlackBG_CS

In Part 1 of his SXSW blog series, Robert Egert recaps some of the SXSW themes that are transforming the way the world looks at healthcare.

Massive—that’s the first thing you need to understand about the SXSW experience. At any given time, there are 30 to 50 events to choose from taking place in multiple locations throughout downtown Austin. This means that, unlike conventional conferences, each individual attendee cuts his or her own path through the events by selecting and reselecting from the nearly unmanageable array of keynotes, panel discussions, presentations, and workshops.

Events that feature celebrity speakers or that focus on hot topics can fill up quickly. Dashing from event to event, waiting in long lines, and striking up random conversations en route is part of the experience. Many events include audience QA, so if it suits your fancy you can become part of the public conversation, even if you aren’t an official presenter.

Here’s a highly personal recap of the themes, issues, and events that impressed, stimulated, and/or frightened me:

BIOMETRICS

The Idea: The pervasive collection of quantified biometric data will transform healthcare.

Wearable, implanted, and otherwise applied technologies will collect vast amounts of data on each of us throughout the day and night regardless of where we are or what we are doing. The collected data won’t only be sent to our phones—it will also be shared with physicians and aggregated into an ever-expanding library of health data.

This library can be used to evaluate the impacts of lifestyle choices on health and longevity (how much of what kinds of exercise must you do to reduce hypertension?). They can also measure the impact of pharmacologic therapies (which drug was more effective?), they can help identify disease patterns (what patterns around comorbidity should be looked at?), and they can provide real-time reports on just about anything you want to know about human behavior and health.

Why this is important:

If we combine biometrics with the predictive capabilities of DNA analysis, we’ll be able to obtain a detailed image of our individual health within the larger social context.

CROWD-SOURCED DRUG DISCOVERY

The Idea: Crowd-sourcing health studies and clinical trials.

Current approaches to drug testing and conducting health studies are expensive, slow, and cumbersome. What if we used crowd-sourcing to answer quantifiable health questions?

Jessica Richman, who is the founder of uBiome, a start-up that uses a crowd-sourced approach to collecting scientific health data, proposes that we dramatically change our approach to scientific inquiry. She suggests that with the right protocols and infrastructure in place, crowd-sourcing will be used to speed the evaluation of new products, measure the effectiveness and safety of products already in-market, and obtain quantifiable data on the health impacts of lifestyle choices.

This approach promises to allow us to quickly and efficiently collect larger data sets than ever before. But with this comes the responsibility to maintain processes and checks to maintain scientific integrity.

Why this is important:

It can dramatically reduce the cost of conducting health and drug studies, and it can generate libraries of data for ad hoc inquiry and analysis.

SXSW Series:

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Jan23

LIVING THE BRAND—Awakening the Senses at Congress

conventionIt seems that the time has passed when having more sales reps and a bigger booth at a major congress was enough to attract physicians to learn more about your brand. Beyond the financial and compliance challenges that the industry has encountered in the past decade, leading in part to decreasing attendance from physicians, clients as much as agencies are continuously looking for new ways to catch physicians’ attention.

What if physicians were just like us: curious and playful

At times, new data just doesn’t make the cut in the clutter of a congress…and let’s not mention when there is no new data to present. Of course, physicians are interested in learning more about a new product, indication or technique. However, in today’s reality, it just doesn’t seem to be enough. Having physicians engage with the brand in a fun and truly unique way can actually set the ground for a deeper relationship and more memorable experience.  What if detailing on touch screens, offering games or iPad quizzes, to name a few, were already not enough in this rush for new things? What if physicians were just simply looking to (re)connect with brands whilst having fun?

Success lies in the story you tell and how you tell it

Going beyond the usual techniques to drive interest at congress requires us to take a step back and look to the core of what the company, brand or product stands for. What it means for your client and physicians. After all, congresses are a great opportunity to reach a maximum of physicians while bringing your vision to life. The booth and activities around it, including symposia, then are used to articulate this story.

But how to define the story you want to tell? One way to do so is to look at the company or brand ambition. What they want to change or bring in this world, where they make a difference. Another way is to leverage the unique features of the product (eg, physical properties, MOA, mode of administration, unique manufacturing process, etc).

What do you do once you have a clear story? You offer physicians a sensory experience. This is when curiosity and playfulness come into place. Perceiving, feeling and doing will create a true brand experience. Knowledge is only one part of a person’s understanding.

Two client cases can help illustrate how senses can create emotional connections. An ophthalmic pharmaceutical company, living by the vision of “leading a brighter future,” and whose main products are hydrating eye drops, articulated their booth activity around a water light graffiti. As physicians were writing on the wall with water, the surface of the wall made of thousands of LEDs was illuminating. The client got their main message across: water is essential for the eyes to properly function, and light is an important medium for sight.  Another client, a leading dermatology company, developed a full sensory experience to differentiate its new dermal-filler range at launch and demonstrate that each product was customized to fit physicians’ needs. During a major industry event, physicians were welcomed into an experiential room. They were able to walk around and visit various custom-made “tools” to feel and see the products (eg, an injection bar,  a gel texture tool to touch the products, and a visual tool  to play with product elasticity). Both cases were based on the core of the brand vision and did create a memorable journey for physicians.

What will experiential activities do for physicians and your clients?

Physicians are keen to interact with their peers and such activities will make them want to share and tell. Word of mouth will not only drive traffic to your activities but also create brand awareness. Physicians will remember your client’s brand and the experience they had with it. They will probably want to engage with it after the event. Creative executions will also differentiate your client and position them as innovative and bold.

Brand experience is about going back to the basics: our senses

OCH Paris won a 2013 Global Award in the category Art & Technique: User Experience (click here to access the Global Awards website http://www.theglobalawards.com/winners/2013/index.php).

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