Oct14

Learning From a Physician First Hand

Kareem Blog ImageMy name is Kareem Royes and I just completed my first year in medical school. I’ve had the opportunity to return to OCHWW Planning this past summer. Over the past year, I have worked very closely with different physicians in the hospital setting, which has allowed me to gather some new insights that I am happy to share about one of OCHWW’s biggest customers, the healthcare professional (HCP). These insights can drive tactics that will not only improve our customers’ experience, but also maximize our clients’ ROI.

Insight 1: Physicians have an inherent distrust of sale reps

One key insight medical planners and marketers frequently do not consider is that physicians have distrust for the information provided to them by drug sales reps. HCPs do not think sales reps have the medical education and years of clinical practice to tell them how to use a drug. Physicians almost unanimously prefer to obtain information from other physicians who are experts and researchers in the therapeutic area of interest. As such, there is a tremendous opportunity to improve our clients’ penetration into these practices by leveraging more physician experts, also known as “thought leaders” or “key opinion leaders,” to provide detail through webinars to physicians who are not open to speaking with sales reps.

Insight 2: The whole is more important than the individual part

We are currently in the era of using apps to enhance our day-to-day experience and interactions. This is no different for HCPs, most of whom also use smart devices. In tactical planning, we often pitch ideas around creating apps that educate physicians about a drug, or a disease, or help them follow up with care for a patient with only one disease. The flip side to this is that on average, each physician will have 2,000 patients in his or her practice and will treat over a 100 diseases. Therefore, our challenge is to convince physicians that using an app that is niched to provide care for only one disease or patient will add value to their experience. Again there is a tremendous opportunity for agencies to work with their clients to create apps that provide a more holistic experience for the physician. Physicians are more likely to engage and frequently use an app if it will cover multiple therapeutic areas and drugs, or can accommodate a significant portion of the patients in their practice.

Insights 3: Always vow to do no harm

The healthcare industry is currently transitioning to the use of electronic medical records (EMRs). The ultimate goal is to increase proper recordkeeping, increase the efficiency of the healthcare system, and facilitate physicians’ communicating better within different specialties when caring for patients. One of the frequent asks we get from our clients is, how can we penetrate EMRs to keep our products top of mind for physicians? Well there is no simple answer to this question. The technology is relatively new but it has a lot of potential to keep our clients’ brands top of mind. Opportunities exist to provide “pop-up” alerts about a drug when certain information is entered into the EMR. This can certainly help keep our clients’ drugs top of mind when a physician is filling out a patient’s chart. However, because physicians sometimes consider EMRs to be burdensome to their practice, agencies’ penetration into this space should be seamless, without adding any burden to physician practices.

Recently I was able to integrate these findings into the brand plan for a drug in the oncology space. Our client tasked us with developing three big ideas that would drive their business, considering a strong competitive landscape with increases in the barriers to accessing physicians. To address this, we proposed:

  1. Physician expert videos that could be leveraged on the drug website and on a YouTube channel where physicians could learn from experts about the drug. This allows physicians to hear from experts on their own time without adding significant burden to their workday.
  2. Leveraging EMR alerts to inform drug sales rep when a doctor has a new patient. This allows reps to detail physicians about drugs when it is immediately relevant in practices that are amenable to rep visits.
  3. And finally, to help differentiate the drug from its competitor, we proposed an unbranded platform which leverages the use of an app to provide all the relevant information about treating the cancer and all the drugs available for this cancer. This provides a more robust app that physicians are more likely to engage with and use repeatedly.

Overall our ideas were well received, and we are currently in the processing of fine-tuning the ideas to determine feasibility for next year. Stay tuned!

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Also posted in Culture, Education, Healthcare Communications, Physician Communications, Technology | Tagged , , , | Comments closed
Oct9

Fire All Your Reps

Fire All Your Reps Image BlogOkay, that may be a bit extreme. But marketing drugs to HCPs is no longer a guarantee of sales.

As the US healthcare system has shifted its focus from “fee-for-service” to the dual goals of increasing quality while decreasing cost, the power of the individual HCP has been on the decline. Centralized systems of care (ACOs, IDNs, large hospital systems or physician group practices) function to meet these goals by implementing standard methods of delivering care, that the individual provider executes—including the menu of drugs he or she has to choose from, and when.

Consider the September 24 Wall Street Journal article detailing the refined sales strategy that pharma companies are taking. Focusing on the sales call of a “key account manager” to a large system administrator (rather than the 2,600 doctors within the system), the article details much of the impact that pharma is seeing from the changes to our healthcare system. As insurers and the federal government increasingly implement payments based on the effectiveness of care, large systems take control of how care is delivered to manage the costs. A handful of decision-makers at these organizations control how care is delivered—eradicating the influence of the rep on the prescribing doctor.

Pharma has already shifted away from the sales rep who makes the pitch to the doctor. Consider the information from ZS Associates, a consulting firm: 50% of the doctors in the US are considered “access restricted” in some way, and in 2005 pharma companies employed over 100,000 sales reps—which is down to 63,000 in 2014.

While the role of the individual provider has become less influential, the sales rep still has a role to play. Pharma’s marketing and sales approach needs to mimic what its customers are doing—coordinating efforts across all levels and locations of care, and providing targeted support at the pivotal interaction points. Pharma companies have piloted and implemented these integrated sales teams at key locations, and their prominence will only increase as HCP access continues to decline. As emerging delivery models become more sophisticated, the traditional “clinical data” approach will become only a small piece of the drug value story, while economics, efficiency, care coordination, adherence and wrap-around support share the spotlight.

So fire all the reps? No. But we need to redefine their role to better support the new world we live in.

 

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Also posted in Access, Culture, Healthcare Communications, Pharmaceutical, Strategy | Tagged , , | Comments closed
Jan23

LIVING THE BRAND—Awakening the Senses at Congress

conventionIt seems that the time has passed when having more sales reps and a bigger booth at a major congress was enough to attract physicians to learn more about your brand. Beyond the financial and compliance challenges that the industry has encountered in the past decade, leading in part to decreasing attendance from physicians, clients as much as agencies are continuously looking for new ways to catch physicians’ attention.

What if physicians were just like us: curious and playful

At times, new data just doesn’t make the cut in the clutter of a congress…and let’s not mention when there is no new data to present. Of course, physicians are interested in learning more about a new product, indication or technique. However, in today’s reality, it just doesn’t seem to be enough. Having physicians engage with the brand in a fun and truly unique way can actually set the ground for a deeper relationship and more memorable experience.  What if detailing on touch screens, offering games or iPad quizzes, to name a few, were already not enough in this rush for new things? What if physicians were just simply looking to (re)connect with brands whilst having fun?

Success lies in the story you tell and how you tell it

Going beyond the usual techniques to drive interest at congress requires us to take a step back and look to the core of what the company, brand or product stands for. What it means for your client and physicians. After all, congresses are a great opportunity to reach a maximum of physicians while bringing your vision to life. The booth and activities around it, including symposia, then are used to articulate this story.

But how to define the story you want to tell? One way to do so is to look at the company or brand ambition. What they want to change or bring in this world, where they make a difference. Another way is to leverage the unique features of the product (eg, physical properties, MOA, mode of administration, unique manufacturing process, etc).

What do you do once you have a clear story? You offer physicians a sensory experience. This is when curiosity and playfulness come into place. Perceiving, feeling and doing will create a true brand experience. Knowledge is only one part of a person’s understanding.

Two client cases can help illustrate how senses can create emotional connections. An ophthalmic pharmaceutical company, living by the vision of “leading a brighter future,” and whose main products are hydrating eye drops, articulated their booth activity around a water light graffiti. As physicians were writing on the wall with water, the surface of the wall made of thousands of LEDs was illuminating. The client got their main message across: water is essential for the eyes to properly function, and light is an important medium for sight.  Another client, a leading dermatology company, developed a full sensory experience to differentiate its new dermal-filler range at launch and demonstrate that each product was customized to fit physicians’ needs. During a major industry event, physicians were welcomed into an experiential room. They were able to walk around and visit various custom-made “tools” to feel and see the products (eg, an injection bar,  a gel texture tool to touch the products, and a visual tool  to play with product elasticity). Both cases were based on the core of the brand vision and did create a memorable journey for physicians.

What will experiential activities do for physicians and your clients?

Physicians are keen to interact with their peers and such activities will make them want to share and tell. Word of mouth will not only drive traffic to your activities but also create brand awareness. Physicians will remember your client’s brand and the experience they had with it. They will probably want to engage with it after the event. Creative executions will also differentiate your client and position them as innovative and bold.

Brand experience is about going back to the basics: our senses

OCH Paris won a 2013 Global Award in the category Art & Technique: User Experience (click here to access the Global Awards website http://www.theglobalawards.com/winners/2013/index.php).

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Also posted in advertising, Branding, conventions, Global Marketing, Healthcare Communications, Marketing, Pharmaceutical, Physician Communications, Technology, Uncategorized, Vendors | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments closed