Apr20

Forget Mobile First, Think Customer First

23

Matt Balogh shaking hands with the future of health tech at SXSW 2015

Observations and inspirations from the Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide team attending SXSW 2015 in Austin. Our healthcare specialists are reporting activity in real time. Our team will post updates as they become available. Check back daily for event coverage, local flavor, and insights that will help you accelerate your healthcare marketing efforts.

Report by Matt Balogh/

If you’ve never been there, SXSW Interactive is five intense days of formal sessions starting in the morning and running past dinner, with various meet-up and gatherings before and after. Layered in the middle are three massive expos: Trade—with everything from startup tech to NASA; Gaming—with all the latest experiences; and, new this year, Med Tech and Health—having a dedicated stage and hall, elevating and centralizing healthcare within the SXSW Interactive experience. It’s a fantastic opportunity to meet up with like-minded, passionate individuals who are truly making a difference, to exchange stories, and to create lasting relationships and partnerships.

This year’s SXSW Interactive was an amazing mix of brilliant speakers and entrepreneurs across multiple disciplines and backgrounds covering various topics. But if I had to distill all that passion and insight down to just one idea that transcended any individual, event, or context, it would be this: to do great work, start with your customers in mind, form a hypothesis around them, test, repeat.

Though not my first session, the first time I really started considering this as a key takeaway of SXSW Interactive was listening to Mariya You, Xanadu Mobile, talk about Rapid Iteration on Mobile. In an industry of 2.5 million apps in the Apple app store, with users averaging between two to four on a daily basis, and where it can take $50K to build an iPhone app that only averages $4K in revenue, it literally pays to think about what your consumers want. She went on to articulate a well-defined, pragmatic framework of creating a hypothesis, prototyping, and testing in the mobile world. Reduce problems down to the simplest “core loop” (a gaming term that defines a core set of actions that support both you and your users) and build from there. This is user-centric design.

Again I heard the same message from Nick Crocker, MyFitnessPal, while discussing how MyFitnessPal cuts their mass amounts of data to understand not just what people are doing but also why they are doing it, and then use those insights to adjust the experience to help them do it. He continued on to say, always reduce it to the simplest, most digestible form to make sure they come back tomorrow. Don’t use yourself as a proxy. Consider the 45-year-old mom in Wyoming with three kids and a partner who works, who has been fighting obesity for the last 25 years and doesn’t have easy access to good fruits and vegetables.

Vinnie Ramesh, Wellframe, and Jason Oberfest, Mango Health, reiterated this with the comment, “You are not the consumer. Many times you need to have empathy for the user but, for instance, you’ve never had cancer before. So it’s harder to relate than with something like commerce… What consumers want is different than providers, is different than physicians, is different than payers, and is different from pharma.” Oberfest continued, “Real innovation needs to be making people’s lives better every day.”

I even found this trend in a random talk I stumbled into with a fun name, “Would You Torture a Robot?” led by Richard Fischer, BBC Worldwide. In this group discussion, we touched on human-computer interactions and creating affinity by naming machines like Amazon’s Alexa (the given name of their Echo product). In this fantastic group discussion we talked about adding value through context, which only comes through research and plenty of testing. Research and testing that is becoming so increasingly important as healthcare quickly adopts mHealth, remote care, and monitoring chronic conditions, and we rely on these interactions to provide better, personalized care.

On the high end of the spectrum, Geoff McGrath, McLaren Applied Technologies, talked a lot about Formula 1’s immense use of data and insights and how we can apply that to healthcare. In a sport that spends hundreds of millions of dollars on optimization, “Data,” says McGrath, “is not there for simple insights, it’s there to change the way we think about the system… you have to optimize the person and the machine, but you have to really think about how they work together.” Julian Jenkins, GSK Research & Development, further noted, “It’s important to be thoughtful and understand the question you are trying to answer… when you have the right question to ask you will be effective.”

And, of course it won’t surprise you to hear this same message was delivered by Astro Teller, Captain of Moonshots at Google[x]. “Get out of the conference room,” he says. “Nothing beats getting in the real world to test what simulators say is possible, and to create the list of 10,000 things you didn’t anticipate.” When it comes to things like giant power-producing kites, networked balloons that travel on the edge of space, or self-driving cars, there’s no substitute for high winds, -40 degree temperatures, or getting people behind the wheel to see how they act. Google had self-driving cars ready for highway use years ago, said Dr. Teller, “but when we put them out for testing in real world situations, we found humans aren’t a very good backup plan for automation, so we went back to the drawing board.”

When people talk about healthcare, they think about regulatory oversight, rules, laws, and an abundance of red-tape processes all driving up cost and time to market while pushing down quality and experience. At first brush, many dismiss healthcare as too difficult of an industry to follow constraints like hypothesizing, prototyping, testing, and refining.

But I disagree.

When it comes to healthcare, these same reasons are the reasons we HAVE to iterate. The further down the line we are when we test something, the less apt we are to accept the feedback we receive, to change, and to be better. Our complex system of checks, balances, and reviews actually mandates that we get it right the first time. User-centric design is more imperative within the complex world of healthcare communications than it is outside. Here we don’t have six major launches per year or constantly rotating materials—we don’t always get an immediate second chance to course correct. We need to be leading these methodologies, not following. The reality is that it’s in pharma’s DNA to innovate, to keep moving things forward—developing, understanding, and enhancing the standard of care.

Just at the end of Dr. Teller’s keynote, someone texted in a question paraphrased as, “Google is a big company—how can the rest of us afford to test and fail like you do?” To which Dr. Teller responded, “You’ve missed the point! You can’t afford not to!”

Report by Matt Balogh/

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Posted in SXSW Interactive | Comments closed
Apr14

SXSW 2015: Connected Health Is Here to Stay

Observations and inspirations from the Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide team attending SXSW 2015 in Austin. Our healthcare specialists are reporting activity in real time. Our team will post updates as they become available. Check back daily for event coverage, local flavor, and insights that will help you accelerate your healthcare marketing efforts.

21

Nelson Figueiredo, Simon Stebbing, Matt Balogh, Martha Walz, & Kofi Annan

Report by Martha Walz/

SXSW 2015 in Austin, TX, was a flurry of new technology, wearables, robots, and lots of buzz around digital health. Discussions ranged from quantifying ourselves and being constantly connected to borrowing technology from racecars and even using video games to enhance healthcare. Combining that with the pervasiveness of mobile technology, one thing became clear: connected health is here to stay.

Increasingly, we use our devices to collect information about our health and well-being. Whether it’s counting steps using a wearable device or tracking calories with a fitness app, we are generating a vast amount of data about ourselves. This information has the potential to be truly transformational in our lives, and we as healthcare marketers are uniquely positioned to influence that transformation.

As healthcare marketers, we have a holistic view of the healthcare landscape. We market to patients, healthcare professionals, and payers, so we understand the distinct challenges each segment faces. We can take a step back and look at the impact this vast amount of health data can have across the entire healthcare ecosystem:

• patients will feel a sense of ownership of their health by generating data;
• healthcare professionals with have a more holistic view of their patients’ health, since they will have data over a long period of time and not just in that instance when the patient is in the office;
• and payers can find trends in the data and create programs and tools for providers and patients that lead to better health outcomes.

Furthermore, we have the opportunity to reinvent how interactions in healthcare happen. With our knowledge of the newest technologies, we can confront the challenge of porting user-generated health data into EHRs so that it is actually usable for doctors. We can create new ways for patients to interact with their doctors through mobile technology, cutting healthcare costs in the process. And we can streamline processes for payers and finally realize the full potential that EHRs and EMRs promise.

SXSW 2015 showed us the potential of connected health. I’m looking forward to SXSW 2016 to see just how far connected health can go. And we will be there leading the charge.

Report by Martha Walz/

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Posted in SXSW Interactive | Comments closed
Apr10

Taking SXSW Back to the Healthcare Workplace

Observations and inspirations from the Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide team attending SXSW 2015 in Austin. Our healthcare specialists are reporting activity in real time. Our team will post updates as they become available. Check back daily for event coverage, local flavor, and insights that will help you accelerate your healthcare marketing efforts.19

Report by Simon Stebbing/
How do you disseminate a week at SXSW and make it relevant to you and your colleagues’ lives within a healthcare agency?

It is far from simple, as there is lots to take away, lots of learnings, lots of information, yet not all of it is tangible or apparently immediately applicable to everyday business. But then again, SXSW is not about everyday business.

My take-outs from SXSW and how they impact the healthcare industry include:
• Thinking differently
• Look at how you can learn and steal from consumer trends, products and thinking
• Simplify everything
• Streamline approaches and people involved
• Fail and fail often—failure is a sign you are trying new things

And all of these can be brought to life through the fantastic examples, stories and anecdotes the evangelists at SXSW shared—from the Google Loon and Wing learnings, to how McLaren F1s are involved in healthcare, and not forgetting the inspirational story from DARPA of how they created prosthetic arms controlled by the mind that allowed a woman to accurately fly a fighter jet simulator.

SS SXSW Google

So how do I share all this with my colleagues and help drive how it affects our creativity, innovation and ways of working? Primarily by sharing these stories, enthusing the passion and essence of those who shared it at SXSW, and by trying to get as many people as possible to SXSW 2016.

So here is to a blog post that is short, simple and hopefully more focused than the scope of work to cook brownies in the US Air Force! Intrigued? Get in touch, and I will happily explain all!

Report by Simon Stebbing/

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Posted in SXSW Interactive | Comments closed
Mar24

SXSW Interactive Journal: Day 5 Part 2

Observations and inspirations from the Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide team attending SXSW 2015 in Austin. Our healthcare specialists are reporting activity in real time. Our team will post updates as they become available. Check back daily for event coverage, local flavor, and insights that will help you accelerate your healthcare marketing efforts.

Nancy Harhut

Nancy Harhut

Report by Matt Balogh/

PANEL SUMMARY: Seven
Decision-Science Secrets That Drive Behavior
Presenter:
Nancy Harhut, Chief Creative Officer, Wilde Agency

The emerging field of decision-science is having a game-changing effect on how marketers communicate. Social scientists, neuroscientists, and behavior economists prove how people are hard-wired to behave with 95% of their purchase decisions being made subconsciously, automatically, and instinctively. In this session, Nancy Harhut discusses how we can incorporate persuasive scientific principles into interactive marketing, which we can also apply to healthcare and adherence.

1. Commitment Consistency

Once we make a decision, we have a compelling urge to stay consistent. One way to reinforce this is to have people write something down. Once written, they feel like they need to live up to it—filming yourself is even better, and sharing it with friends is the best. MakeChangeCount.com, for instance, has you sign up, print out, and share your commitment. Once someone knows you’ve made a commitment, you are that much more likely to live up to it. And sticking to it, as we heard this week speaking with MyFitnessPal, is the best indicator of reaching your goals when it comes down to it. This is because cognitive dissonance is when things don’t match and it doesn’t feel good, so we try to be consistent.

In healthcare, this is massively important to adherence. Combined with predictive modeling to understand the trigger behaviors that indicate when someone is going to become non-adherent, commitment consistency can be used to re-energize the relationship.

2. Loss Aversion
The core principle of loss aversion is that we are twice as motivated to avoid pain as we are to seek pleasure. In marketing, we tend to stress the benefits, but every once in a while we need a well-placed loss aversion. Loss aversion is also closely related to the endowment effect, which states that we tend to place more value on things that we own. Put something in my hands, for instance, and I’ll have a harder time giving it back.

Both principles are keys to healthcare and innovation because they define how we can act against our own best interests. If we understand this, we can proactively offset it.

3. Choice Architecture
The way choices or options are presented has a big impact on the way people make decisions about them. The default, for instance, makes a huge difference because most people go with the default. One of the most compelling cases of this in healthcare is organ donation. Countries that default citizens as donors unless they opt out have a much higher rate of donation. With this in mind, architecting choices may be the key to helping people make the healthy decisions.

4. Cognitive Fluency
It may seem obvious, but research backs up that people prefer things that are easier to think about and easier to understand. We also believe them to be more truthful and more accurate. Cognitive fluency has two components: how it looks, and the words you use.

When it comes to looks, don’t get clever with design. Easier-to-read means people will read it. Easier-to-read typefaces are more persuasive. Opposite that, poor design means people think that the product or service is poorly designed as well.

As for the words you choose, if it is hard for our brains to process, we usually just skip it. Princeton University research correlated the effect of easier-to-read stock names on stock performance. The easier-to-pronounce stock names did better than the hard-to-pronounce stock names. Rhymes are also judged to be more accurate and better remembered.

5. Pricing Perceptions
If you sell anything online, you know how hard it is to get people to buy. That’s because having to part with money activates the same part of our brain that controls physical pain. But there are ways around this. For instance, “$120” is perceived as larger than “$120.00,” which can be leveraged to persuade and dissuade choices. Bundling is also a sound choice because, as individual purchases, the brain has a hard time justifying multiple hits of pain vs. a single hit of pain, which the brain prefers.

Harhut goes on to explain more principles of pricing, like “keep the original price on the left and the sale price on the right,” and “the further apart physically the prices are, the more of a deal the brain thinks it is.” But one of the most applicable to healthcare was the concept that if you tell people about the effort that goes into a product, they will be more likely to buy it—a core issue when it comes to the battle against generics and rising costs of care.

6. Copy Nudges
The words that you use and the order you use them in can have a huge influence on what people think about. One set of researchers asked the question, “Is it okay to smoke while you pray?” which drove an overwhelming reply of no. But when phrased as, “Is it okay to pray while you smoke?” the answer became yes. Combined with decision architecture, this can be a powerful tool in persuading positive behavior.

Also related is the information gap theory, which posits that if there is a gap between what you know and what you want to know, you will take action to fill that gap. We also respond better to certain words, like “new” and any variation of “free” as we scan pages, and we have a strong affinity for people who share our name.

We also enjoy the word “because.” Even if a legitimate reason doesn’t follow it, our mind still rationalizes that there is a good, legitimate reason.

7. Design Nudges
Our brain processes images sixty thousand times faster than text and we remember them better. Beyond that, there are still ways to improve the user experience. Using faces helps: we find the eyes irresistible—use them to look at your audience and pull them in or to look where you want them to go.

Color also has a huge impact in terms of recognition, readership, and comprehension. Blue signals trust and lowers pulse rate, red physically speeds up heart rate, yellow triggers the excitement center, and green is easy to process. But what you really want is contrast.

Progress bars are also a good idea, since people prefer to understand what is happening. Accompanying text with a graphic has a greater likelihood of success even if the photo does not support the picture. And showing a chart makes people believe the text more.

Conclusion
The emerging field of decision-science is having a game-changing effect on how marketers communicate. There are lots of “tricks” that can be used to help gain affinity, absorption, and message recall. But it is imperative we keep in mind that behavioral science can work against you as much as it can for you. Principles like cognitive fluency ensure the value meets the expectation, and loss aversion ensures you won’t get burned a second time. There is no substitute for considering your users’ needs and bringing real value, but once you do that, behavioral science can help make the experience the best it can be.

Report by Matt Balogh/

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Posted in SXSW Interactive | Comments closed
Mar17

SXSW Interactive Journal: Day 5 Part 1

Observations and inspirations from the Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide team attending SXSW 2015 in Austin. Our healthcare specialists are reporting activity in real time. Our team will post updates as they become available. Check back daily for event coverage, local flavor, and insights that will help you accelerate your healthcare marketing efforts.

The Imaging Center at UCSF's Adam Gazzaley at SXSW.

The Imaging Center at UCSF’s Adam Gazzaley at SXSW.

Report by Martha Walz/
PANEL SUMMARY: How Video Games Are Disrupting Medicine & Education
Presenters:
Daphne Bavalier, Professor, University of Geneva
Adam Gazzaley, Director and Professor of Neurology, Physiology, and Psychology, UCSF

Despite preconceptions about video games rotting brains, cutting-edge research shows that if the right science is applied to game development, sensitive neural assessments and robust improvements in brain function can become a reality. This technology also has the potential to be therapeutic in other settings.

Action video games such as first-person shooters literally rewire the brain, which is why we are better the next time we play. They enhance brain plasticity and our ability to learn. This was proven in a study in which subjects played an action video game 1 hour a day, 5 days a week for a total of 10 hours. The subjects were tested at the beginning of the study on a topic called mental rotation, which is the ability to rotate 2-D and 3-D objects in the mind. The subjects who played the action games showed improvement in cognitive rotation at the end of the study. By contrast, the control group of subjects, who played a puzzle game, showed no improvement after the study. Further, those who played game still showed that improvement 5 months later, even though they had stopped playing.

Another improvement was in that was in attentional control. Subjects who played the action video games demonstrated sustained attention, and responded more quickly and precisely to diagnostic tests. They also showed an enhanced ability to learn: they were able to ignore distractions and focus.

A second study tested older adults without cognitive deficiencies, to enhance their cognitive control. A custom game gave the subjects 2 tasks to do at the same time, and they could only level up only when both tasks were mastered. Subjects played the game for 12 hours over 4 weeks. At the end of the study, the subjects’ ability to multitask exceeded that of 20-year-olds. The working memory and attention span improvements were still seen 6 months later, even after not playing the game during that time.

What are the healthcare benefits of these learnings? Studies are ongoing in areas such as ADHD, depression, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer’s, and autism. These areas are currently dominated by pharmaceutical solutions to correct cognitive deficiencies. Perhaps in the near future, we will see doctors prescribe video games instead of pills to retrain and rewire the brain.

Report by Martha Walz/

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Posted in SXSW Interactive | Comments closed
Mar16

SXSW Interactive Journal: Day 4 Part 1

Observations and inspirations from the Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide team attending SXSW 2015 in Austin. Our healthcare specialists are reporting activity in real time. Our team will post updates as they become available. Check back daily for event coverage, local flavor, and insights that will help you accelerate your healthcare marketing efforts.

Alan Greene, Linda Avey, Sam De Brouwer, & Jessica Richman

Alan Greene, Linda Avey, Sam De Brouwer, & Jessica Richman

Report by Martha Walz/
PRESENTATION SUMMARY: Decoding Our Bodies: A New Era of Citizen Health
Presenters:
Linda Avey, CEO, We Are Curious Inc
Sam De Brouwer, Co-Founder, Scanadu
Alan Greene, Medical Expert, Scanadu
Jessica Richman, Founder, uBiome

Overview:
Healthcare is no longer a spectator sport. In the new world of health and medicine, we patients are the prime players in the decoding, understanding, and accessing our own wellness. Open access to data will change the way we monitor and impact our lives. We can now be active participants in our own healthcare.

One massive shift in healthcare in recent years is that doctors are no longer the repositories of health information. Any of us can access a wealth of health information via our smartphones. Another shift will happen soon: doctors will no longer be the owners of the diagnosis. With the data we collect from wearables and integrate into apps such as Apple’s HealthKit, we will be able to learn just about everything we want to know about ourselves. If we can understand the data coming out of our bodies, we can then have better conversations with our doctors.

We didn’t use to have health data about ourselves in real time. We only had access to it from our doctors, disclosed only when something wasn’t right. Acquiring this data took time, beginning with a waiting room visit and continuing pacing in front of the phone for test results. With today’s new tools, we can collect this data over time, and display it at the doctor’s office. This cuts out time asking for a health history, and cuts to the chase of results. This information leads to quicker diagnoses, which in turn leads to better health outcomes.

We will learn more about ourselves through the open access to our health data. Some data points will be diagnostic, others actionable. Doctors will still be health experts, and will still interpret data for us, but they will occupy a more consultatory role. This will result in a shift to truly patient-centric care.

Report by Martha Walz/

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Posted in SXSW Interactive | Comments closed
Mar15

SXSW Interactive Journal: Day 3 Part 3

Observations and inspirations from the Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide team attending SXSW 2015 in Austin. Our healthcare specialists are reporting activity in real time. Our team will post updates as they become available. Check back daily for event coverage, local flavor, and insights that will help you accelerate your healthcare marketing efforts.

Mariya Yao taking the stage at SXSW 2015

Mariya Yao taking the stage at SXSW 2015

Report by Matt Balogh/

PANEL SUMMARY: Rapid Iteration on Mobile
Presenter:
Mariya Yao, Founder & Creative Director, Xanadu Mobile

Mobile is an increasingly important channel, but doing it right requires iteration which can be difficult compared to web. Higher cost developers & designers, complicated technologies, and longer development times are all working against you. But also against you are the numbers. 22% of apps are only opened one time, and 62% of users stop using an app within a month. Just development of an iOS app can cost up to $60k but average revenue is only $4k. Android numbers are worse. Lay healthcare reviews and approvas on top of that and mobile can seem quite daunting.

So what can we do about it? In this talk Mariya Yao talks about how we can leverage rapid iteration and prototyping to address key market, product, and user risks early and iterate through them quickly. Further, she goes on to introduce us to strategies and frameworks we can use to apply it on our own.

The overall key to this success of rapid iteration and prototyping is understanding what a prototype is and should do for you. This means you have to start by first asking the right questions. Unfortunately, though, this doesn’t always happen. In fact it rarely does.

This is because when people think about prototypes, what they’re really envisioning is wire frames. Wire frames are good, but they are not your first prototype. This is because wire frames only answer design and engagement level questions. Instead of starting with design questions, a prototype should be architected to answer the following three questions. Will people use it? Will they come back to it? Will they potentially pay for it?

These are experience questions, and the goal of the prototype is to cull down the experience to what Yao calls the core loop. Core loop is a term she borrowed from game developers. At its simplest, a core loop is that main set of actions that will make both you and your users successful – which is usually only three steps.

Even for complex engagements the goal of experiential prototyping is to keep core loops simple. FarmVille’s core loop is buy seeds, grow seeds, sell crops, and then it starts again. DropBox’s would be get space fill space, get more space. Amazon’s would be read reviews, buy products, leave reviews.

From here it is just a matter of evolving features that support the core loop. Drop box, for instance added automatic photo upload to their app — a convenient feature for users that still supports the business goals of DropBox. Amazon added features to make reviews easy and review ratings, not products, to help people quickly distill the value of the ratings themselves.

Core Loops are simple, but creating them can be very difficult. The trick is to get to the right core loop that people are willing to go through, and understand how often they are willing to go through it. This is your first prototype, and there are two ways to get there: hacking and hustling.

Hacking prototypes is just as it sounds. Find some coders, and get them to dive in and create a low fidelity, interactive version of your idea. Hacking is what many people think of when they consider prototyping, which quickly becomes an intimidation barrier. But it’s not the only way.

Hustling, a term Yao leveraged to talk about prototyping without lifting a finger of code, relies a lot more on creativity, insights, and mash-ups Here she give four strategies to bring thee experiential prototypes to life quickly: concierge, platform, competitor, and creative.

Concierge prototypes leverage experiences and back fill with manual labor. Concierge prototyping Instagram, for instance, would have your mates email you photos that you manually filter with photoshop before posting to social networks like Instagram. From there you can measure engagement vs control and see if your mates enjoyed their experience.

Platform prototypes leverage, as its named, platforms built specifically for WYSIWYG prototyping and app creation. With just some clicking, dragging, and intelligent use of tools like Game Salad you can create a great an interactive experiential prototype.

Competitor prototyping is similar, but it leverages your competitors applications with a bit of tweaking or leveraging of existing open-source information to achieve your experience. This is a sort of mix of the first two strategies.

Creative prototyping comes into effect when the experience is rich or deep and hard to create quickly and cheaply. The Elmo’s Monster Maker team applied this thinking when they wanted a high fidelity prototype of and complex experience by cutting out a giant iPhone and filming a person standing behind the screen portion. With some large poster board, a few pens, and a camera they were able to test engagement with a group of kids and quickly refine the idea.

Healthcare communications are a complex path of approvals a regulators. Each step is a gate that makes it hard to go backward so iteration can be difficult. But this also makes iteration more important. The earlier we can ask and answer the right questions, the better. Core loops are key to doing this; culling down complex health experiences to their simple core actions, and building from there.

Prototyping and iterating are equally as important. Combining the strategies of hacking and hustling we can create prototypes that go far beyond the design tests of wireframes. But key to success is spending time to come up with the right questions to test with the prototype. Where adherence is our goal, testing for affinity becomes massively important, because in healthcare engagement can lead to better outcomes.

Rapid prototyping and iteration is not something we do often in healthcare. As an industry we can be perceived as slow and lumbering because of the complexity. But it doesn’t have to be this way. In fact, research and testing is at the core of what we do. Starting with the right questions, building prototypes that test those hypothesis, and iterating forward will not only help up produce better, more engaging products, but also drive more positive outcomes.

Report by Matt Balogh/

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Posted in SXSW Interactive | Comments closed
Mar15

SXSW Interactive Journal: Day 3 Part 2

Observations and inspirations from the Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide team attending SXSW 2015 in Austin. Our healthcare specialists are reporting activity in real time. Our team will post updates as they become available. Check back daily for event coverage, local flavor, and insights that will help you accelerate your healthcare marketing efforts.

Nelson Figueiredo, Martha Walz, Simon Stebbing, Kofi Annan, Alex Cho, & Dan Chichester

Nelson Figueiredo, Martha Walz, Simon Stebbing, Kofi Annan, Alex Cho, & Dan Chichester

Report by Martha Walz/

PANEL SUMMARY: Gaming the Hospital for High-Quality Patient Care
Presenters:
Clint Carlos, CEO and Founder, AMPT Health (Gear Five Studio)
Graham Lowe, President, Graham Lowe Group
Paula van de Nes, Director, Medical Strategy, LLNS

Overview
Healthcare workers are disengaged in the workplace. In Canada, about 1 in 10 healthcare workers is dissatisfied with their work and disengaged from their roles. This poses risks in terms of patient safety and quality of care, and hospitals need to find solutions to this problem.

Engagement improves when employees believe their hospital truly values quality care, and quality care leads to better patient outcomes. To that end, interactive gaming may aid hospitals seeking to improve this engagement.

Gaming in a hospital setting sounds counter-intuitive – we don’t want doctors playing with their patients’ lives. But by using principles of game theory, hospitals can understand what drives their employees to engage and adopt positive behaviors in the workplace. Recognition, the drive to win, social interaction, and incentives motivate people to keep playing a game, and these same strategies can be applied within the hospital setting.

Unlike other industries, people who work in healthcare are passionate — passionate about patients and delivering the best care possible. Hospitals can take this passion and cultivate a culture of quality care that is driven by its employees. This will create a sense of ownership among employees — they feel like part of a team. This in turn will drive more engagement. Having fun, goal-based “games” will lead to collaboration and a sense of accomplishment which in turn will improve quality of care. Many informal practices exist today that dovetail with gaming, even if it’s not called that outright.

How can hospitals integrate game-based processes? It needs to start with a committed leadership that’s willing to trust it’s employees to create a team-based culture. The game-based processes have to be authentic and and provide positive reinforcement instead of focusing on negative feedback. The culture of teamwork that this will engender will lead to happier employees and healthier patients.

Report by Martha Walz/

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Posted in SXSW Interactive | Comments closed
Mar15

SXSW Interactive Journal: Day 3 Part 1

Observations and inspirations from the Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide team attending SXSW 2015 in Austin. Our healthcare specialists are reporting activity in real time. Our team will post updates as they become available. Check back daily for event coverage, local flavor, and insights that will help you accelerate your healthcare marketing efforts.

Report by Matt Balogh/

Would You Torture a Robot?

From the “Would You Torture a Robot?” session at SXSW 2015

PRESENTATION SUMMARY: Would You Torture a Robot?
Presenter:
Richard Fisher, Deputy Editor BBC Future, BBC Worldwide

Overview

Robots are just machines, or are they? Cruelty to robots seems like a strange topic, and at first glance people tend not to consider it an issue. But can humans have an affinity for a machine? Studies suggest that people often feel unconfortable when watching social robots tortured or harmed. Why is this? And what role can something like this play in healthcare?

After watching a pleo robot for a few minutes, study participants were asked to take a hammer and destroy the simple toy. Many people refused, even under threat of destroying others robots. Further, bomb squad robots tend to be repaired, not replaced, again suggesting a human connection to the machine. In a YouTube video posted by Boston Dynamics (http://youtu.be/M8YjvHYbZ9w) they showed a robot “dog”, and demonstrated how it can be kicked without falling over. This caused internet outrage akin to kicking a real dog resulting in a “no robots were harmed in the making of this video” disclaimer at the end.

Though the link may not seem strong, in healthcare we are leveraging robots and computers more every year. On the high-end, at Mercy San Juan Hospital in Carmichael, CA the RP-VITA remote doctor is being leveraged directly in patient care. On the low end we use apps to track our care, and we all know how we feel about our ‘personal’ devices. In the middle robot companions like GeriJoy and Tedi are used for both companionship and information collection in elder care and infants respectively.

Throughout SXSW, and in healthcare in general, we are constantly thinking about adherence. How can we leverage this research to influence behaviors such that people can gain an affinity for those things that can help improve their lives?

In this talk we lightly touch on ideas like the naming of our machines akin to Amazon’s Alexa (the name of their Echo product) to help create that affinity. Further we need to add value, and must have context, which comes from research and plenty of testing. In the end it will be our affinity for ourselves and our robots that will make good healthcare programs great.

Report by Matt Balogh/

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Posted in SXSW Interactive | Comments closed
Mar14

SXSW Interactive Journal: Day 2 Part 1

Observations and inspirations from the Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide team attending SXSW 2015 in Austin. Our healthcare specialists are reporting activity in real time. Our team will post updates as they become available. Check back daily for event coverage, local flavor, and insights that will help you accelerate your healthcare marketing efforts.

Report by Martha Walz/

Day 2 Part 1

The Wolfram mascot & Martha Walz celebrating Pi Day at SXSW

PRESENTATION SUMMARY: Digital Health and the Consumerization of Healthcare
Presenters:
Ray Bradford, Founder & CEO, Spruce Health
Mike Lee, Co-Founder & CEO, The Future Market, founded myfitnesspal
Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Technology Reporter, The Wall Street Journal
Glen Tullman, Chairman & CEO, Livongo Health

Overview
The move towards a consumerized healthcare system gives patients more control over their care and will have significant, lasting implications for the sector.

We live in a world today where it’s easier to be unhealthy than healthy. But now that we have the technology and connectivity, we won’t have to wait in the doctors office for an hour to see the doctor for 5 minutes. Now healthcare can work the way everything else in our lives work. We can decide where and when to see a doctor, without even leaving home.

Obamacare has changed the landscape. Now that people are spending their own money on healthcare, they are making different decisions regarding their health than they did before.

>50% of doctor interactions will happen online in the future via mobile device. This will make healthcare faster and cheaper.

The government is now reimbursing tele-health and remote patient monitoring for >2 chronic conditions, this will drive uptake of mobile health solutions.

Healthcare is a sensitive and personal space, people don’t want to give up data; so trust is critical. We need to be transparent about how we are using the consumer’s data. We need to provide value to the consumer. Patients will authorize who will see data and what they can do with it.

People are analog. Getting them to change behavior is an art, not a science. Be thoughtful about how you present information to users. Don’t make people feel bad, encourage them, and give them actionable information.

Understand the behaviors of the people who will be using the app and design it for them. Be planner or coach, help consumers reach their goals. Dashboards are good for diagnostic info, and we will see more human interaction in these apps. Build trust to reach goals.

There are opportunities to reinvent how interactions in healthcare happen, and improve these interactions. Patients don’t feel rushed when using an app because they aren’t under a time constraint with a doctor. Doctors can give personalized response because all the info is collected and presented to them; they don’t have to spend the time asking these type of questions. These opportunities can increase compliance because the doctor’s orders are with you all the time on your mobile device.

/Report by Martha Walz

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION:
Questions? Comments? You can contact the author directly at blog@ochww.com.
Please allow 24 hours for response.

Posted in SXSW Interactive | Comments closed