Feb24

More Than Just an Office Move…Much More

IMG_0576Winston Churchill once famously stated, “First we shape our buildings. Thereafter they shape us.”

Last week, our UK healthcare marketing agency moved into new purpose-built offices on London’s South Bank, and for the first time we are alongside our colleagues in other Ogilvy agencies. I believe Churchill’s view on how buildings inevitably shape us, and our behaviours, is going to be particularly relevant during this exciting new phase of our agency’s evolution.

Much work and planning obviously goes into any major office relocation, but never has this been truer than of the journey we have taken in designing our new office environment. Supported along the way by experts in office design, human behaviour, space planning and collaborative working, we believe we have moved our team into an environment that truly has the ability to change the way we work.

Some of the main themes – observed here already in our first week – relating to the way our buildings and environment shape us and our work include:

  • New neighbour, new perspective: The office is designed with barely any ‘fixed desk’ positions. Everyone is encouraged to sit in a different place every day. This approach, although perhaps feared by some initially, has been a unanimous success. On a daily basis we hear about the benefit of drawing on new perspectives, “getting a different point of view,” or just learning from what someone else is doing. Fixed desking already seems a distant ”missed opportunity” from the past.
  • Collaborate, collaborate, collaborate: In our new space, IMG_0698gone are the days of endless banks of desks, replaced instead by a range of different zones and work settings: café tables, sofas, booths, work pods and benches. The single aim: drive collaboration. And it works. Provide people with the spaces to meet, share and grow and they do it…relentlessly. Already we see that what used to be achieved via 30 emails and half a day, can be improved upon by a 15-minute chat on the sofa.
  • Break the silos: Ogilvy Healthworld has long held the belief that the best work comes from channelling neutral thinking and big ideas that span all marketing disciplines. And yet the agency’s physical”geography” has in some ways lagged behind and remained siloed. Until now. The completely open-plan setting we now have does not speak of any ”divisions” or ”departments,” just of a truly integrated business. And it’s this integration that will in turn lead to even bigger and better thinking for our clients.
  • Be inspired: And finally, it’s amazing to see already the refreshed energy and passion that is derived simply by ”being” in a different place. We are lucky, yes, in being situated along London’s ”creative mile” on the South Bank, surrounded by leading arts and cultural establishments and an inspiring creative ”vibe.” And we are lucky too to have one of the most inspiring views of new and old London stretched out in front of us across the Thames. But these facts alone are not what drive the greatest levels of invigoration. The mere fact we are in a new space, with new and interesting stimuli, further supports the notion that new buildings, fresh environments, ”change” us.

So, in conclusion, we IMG_0607believe our new building genuinely has started to ”shape us” already, and will continue to do so. It feels like a rich and precious time for the agency and its staff to feed off each other in different ways and be inspired by our new environment to search for greatness for our clients and their brands.

We invite any current employees, future employees, clients and prospects alike, to come and experience this invigorating environment for themselves, and experience a little of what Churchill had in mind.

Check out more photos and videos of our brand new office here: Ogilvy Healthworld UK Twitter.

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Also posted in advertising, agency life, Art, behavior change, Clients, Creativity, Culture, Design, Great Ideas, Health & Wellness, Healthcare Communications, Strategy | Comments closed
Jan7

How Saying Thank You Can Transform Your Career

ThankYou 200x149

How did you feel the last time someone truly thanked you?
Not just the mumbled thanks for holding the door or handing you a tissue: a true, heartfelt expression of gratitude.

Being thankful can help others and it can help us. Grateful people reported fewer aches and pains and were more likely to engage in healthy activities, according to a study published in Personality and Individual Differences.1 A separate study found that gratitude can lead to increased self-esteem and better relationships with team members and supervisors.2

In addition to the happiness boost that comes from focusing on the good things in your life, saying a simple “thank you” can also bring a huge boost to your career. Recognizing the contributions of your colleagues helps to build stronger, more dedicated teams, and leads your peers to look to you as a leader. Gratitude, like praise, can help to reinforce positive behaviors, leading to a culture of success within your team and organization. Gratitude is also a great way to “pay it forward,” building good will for those moments when you need others to help you achieve your goals or take a risk for you.

Expressing gratitude can also help you to build a professional network. Recent research has confirmed what we have all known for years—that saying “thank you” to a new acquaintance increases the likelihood that he or she will share contact information with you, helping you build your professional network (and make a new friend!).3

So how you can implement gratitude in your career? The first step is simply recognizing that business is a team sport. Has a supervisor taken time out of their day to answer your questions or train you for your next big move? Did a colleague stay late to help you meet a deadline? A sincere, heart-felt thanks can make someone’s day.

Ogilvy CommonHealth also offers a great way to say thank you through the You Earned It! program. This program was created to allow team members to reflect on the contributions necessary to achieve a great outcome and publicly recognize colleagues. According to Darlene Dobry, managing partner, the program has been tremendously successful across all units and skill centers. “It is great to see how infectious the program is. People reach out to thank others and the feeling spreads. It is particularly nice to see people reaching out across departments to thank people they don’t always have a chance to work with and building lasting collaborations.” So the next time a colleague does something great, send them some YEI points and your heartfelt thanks.

“Thank you” may be two simple words, but the recognition and appreciation encapsulated in that short phrase has the power to transform you, your colleagues, and your organization.

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References
1. Hill PL, Allemand M, Roberts BW. Examining the pathways between gratitude and self-rated physical health across adulthood. Pers Individ Dif. 2013;54(1):92-96.
2. Chen LH, Wu CH. Gratitude enhances change in athletes’ self-esteem: the moderating role of trust in coaches. J Appl Sport Psychol. 2014;26(3):349-362.
3. Williams LA, Bartlett MY. Warm thanks: gratitude expression facilitates social affiliation in new relationships via perceived warmth. Emotion. 2015;15(1):1-5.

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Dec3

The Difference Between a Job and the Work

How many times have you been asked by family and friends “what type of work do you do?” And, how many times have you struggled with how to answer the question? How exactly do you respond in a way that they understand? Do you share the details of your daily job, the challenges you may encounter? Do you focus on the trials and tribulations of the daily routine? Or, do you express a sense of the work you are involved in-the mission you dedicate your life to each and every day?

The Eternal Pursuit of Unhappiness - courtesy of instagram.com/ogilvymather

If you’ve read The Eternal Pursuit of Unhappiness published by Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide in 2009, you know that it speaks to the 8 habits of creative communities. They include courage, idealism, curiosity, playfulness, candour, intuition, free-spiritedness, and persistence. The overall messages are geared toward how to turn bad habits, discontent, and sour attitudes into good. And while the book generally speaks to the corporate culture, the work, it also serves up lessons for how we can improve as human beings on a personal level, how to create better life experiences, the work.

Recent television news reports smack of intolerance, bully behavior, lack of teamwork, and lack of respect. If commentators, other “leaders”, and global influencers worked a bit harder at the 8 habits, wouldn’t we be in a better state of mind and actually do a better job at motivating and helping people instead of shutting them down and making them feel disillusioned, in a state of hopelessness, despair, and unhappiness? The “work”, in my mind, is the inner sense of positivity, of paying forward, of keeping true to yourself in an environment of negativity; of lending a hand, of championing an idea when it’s not popular, of having the courage to stand up for what is right regardless of who is advocating, and for defending the character of the effort, having someone’s back, especially when you know that they have given their time and made every effort to move the needle forward. Whether you are in the workplace or at “your home base,” being principled-at all times-is the work.

So perhaps when someone asks you again what you do, think a bit about describing the work you do versus the job you do. What is your contribution to improving healthcare in a positive way for our clients and the pharmaceutical industry as a whole? What eventually benefits the consumers? For example, helping patients who need financial assistance to gain access to the therapies they need to improve their well-being. The more we focus on the ideas and campaigns we create, the honesty and spirit we bring to work each and every day, the teamwork we encourage, the wisdom and passion we pass on to the junior staff, the energy we exhibit and the expressions of thanks we send out, the more grace we practice, the more we instill energy and pride in the organization, we create the place of happiness the book speaks about. In addition, there are many wonderful, positive, and impressive statements of work and demonstrations of community support (whether it be local, state, or global) that Ogilvy employees contribute to on a regular basis. To name a few, there are the personal mentoring efforts, the Chrysalis Initiative, YouEarnedIt, Community Service Day, AHA Heartwalk, Tunnel to Towers Run and Walk, Jersey Cares Coat Drive, and the Community Foodbank of NJ, and Dress for Success. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of similar organizations Ogilvy employees touch in hopes to create a better world.

So ask yourself ….. What line of work are you in???

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Sep11

Wait Up!

Karen Rose Redworks Blog Image_EDCycling down the Greenway in NYC, I became separated from my friends and lost sight of them. I stopped and called my boyfriend from my cell phone but wasn’t entirely certain he had brought his phone with him on his bike. I figured, nothing to do but keep cycling and hopefully catch up with them.

Then my chain broke. Geez! I made another call, then sat down and thought, “Now what?”

Three options came to mind: 1) Find a bicycle store and get the chain repaired; 2) Walk my bike to the Port Authority and take a train home; or 3) Stay on the Greenway and wait in the hopes that my cycling friends would come back and find me.

I dismissed Option 1 quickly: If I left the Greenway, I wouldn’t know if they came by while I was gone. I wasn’t keen on Option 3: Wait?! For how long? No guarantee they’re coming back the same way. My impulse reaction was Option 2: Take a train home and catch up with my friends later.

And I almost went with Option 2. But then I forced myself to slow down, resist a gut response for immediate action, and think it through. What if I walked all the way to the PA and found that I couldn’t take my bike on the train? Then I’d need to return to the Greenway and, well…same concerns as Option 1.

I reluctantly gave in and decided to wait. Not thirty minutes later, I saw my friends cycling toward me. My knights in shining Under Armour! They rigged my chain and got me back in the saddle in record time. And off we went. Problem solved! And all it took was the presence of mind to take a deep breath…and…wait.

On the ride back to the George Washington Bridge, I pondered how often at work we are presented with similar decision-making each and every day. We may not have all the information we need, yet we often need to “keep the job moving.”

But how often do we end up with redos? Or missing something? Or wasting precious time and resources moving something to the next step that would have been better to wait for clearer direction?

Sometimes pausing is the best action you can take.

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Mar27

(In)Sanity Check

Blog Image Insanity2Here’s an all-too-familiar story about a team in Ogilvy CommonHealth – trying to launch a Value Prop, get a label update, overhaul 2 separate iPad assets, and submit 2014 work for an last-minute award. And that’s on top of our regular day-to-day items! As I sat to write this, and looked at the items on my to-do list, I realized that I’m not alone in the fight to keep my sanity in the midst of agency chaos.

As workers in advertising, we have our own type of sanity…but that doesn’t mean it can’t be healthy. Here are the things I’ve seen work for myself and others, to keep us relaxed and sane in even the most stressful environments:

  1. Write everything down – Starting your day (and week) with a to-do list is essential. Add whatever pops up, and cross items off as they’re accomplished. Spend the first 2 minutes in the office (or at home with your first cup of coffee) looking at your calendar. Jot down what meetings you have, what needs to be accomplished. Keep a running list of what you know will be “hot” within the coming days, so you can get ahead of them if time allows.
  2. Take 3 deep breaths – This is helpful for when you want to send a sassy response to an email, or are trapped in a heated meeting. Taking some deep breaths will help lower your heartrate, which will in turn help you make more level-headed decisions.
  3. Take your eyes off of your devices before bed – I know, I’m just as addicted to my email/texts/Facebook/Instagram/Pinterest as you. But take 15 minutes in bed to read a book or do a crossword puzzle. It’ll help you disconnect and start relaxing.
  4. And while we’re talking about bed, sleep – Resting your mind and your nerves will help in all aspects of work and life. If you’re having trouble sleeping because your mind is always racing, refer back to Step 2: slowing your heartrate will help your body relax into sleep. You’re not you when you’re sleep deprived.
  5. Treat yo’ self! – In the wise words of Tom Haverford and Donna Meagle, “treat yo’ self!” It doesn’t have to be extravagant or unnecessary, but treat yourself to something that you know you deserve. It can be as simple as a Starbucks run, or a drink with a friend after work. Give yourself the time that you deserve to reset and recharge.

These are simple solutions. But when we’re in the throes of work, it can be hard to step back and remember to take the needed time for ourselves.

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Jan21

How to Have Your Digital Gadgets and Sleep Too

Haley Dix Blog Thumbnail SmallI am not one to make New Year’s resolutions, but this year I thought maybe I should go back to using a regular alarm clock and turn my digital devices off an hour before going to bed. Recent studies have proven that our beloved electronics may hinder sleep.

Although this resolution could be quite beneficial, I couldn’t help thinking about the following:

“What if I miss a breaking news alert from CNN?”
“What if I don’t respond to a time-sensitive text?”
“What if Beyoncé releases another album on Instagram at midnight?

I guess you can say I have a slight case of “Fear of Missing Out,” popularly known as FOMO. Aside from these hypothetical scenarios, you may find yourself experiencing work-related FOMO. It’s no secret that many of us use electronics to sift through emails or work-related checklists one last time before turning off the lights. Although those 30 minutes at 10 PM on Microsoft Outlook seem harmless, your production of melatonin can be effected. The blue light within electronics can increase brain activity and prevent the pineal gland from releasing melatonin hours before bedtime. This results in your body fighting off the feeling of being tired. While it is advantageous to have your devices on at work to increase alertness, if your goal is rest, blue lights can become the enemy.

So how can we enjoy technology and still gain quality rest?

The idea is gaining momentum worldwide—in 2013, Germany implemented a new practice, discouraging employees from sending work emails after hours, except in cases of emergencies. In 2014, France took to the trend, encouraging employees to turn off their phones and refrain from checking email after their work is complete. Companies such as Volkswagen, Google and Facebook have also made efforts in discouraging late-night email correspondence.

Perhaps we can impose some discipline on our social interactions, but it could be hard to enforce digital abstinence, for example, when you are working on a pitch. But we can still make an effort to promote more healthful digital habits for our teams and ourselves. Perhaps you can set an “email silence” time with your team after jobs are no longer routing for the night. Or insist on a phone call if an emergency arises, rather than constantly trading email. Anything to avoid staring at the blue light into the late hours of the night.

So whether your FOMO is attributed to social or work activities, making a few minor changes can help you enjoy your device and not compromise resting. You may even fall in love with, dare I say, paperback books again in the quest to take small breaks from your gadgets. If so, author Ann Droyd offers a humorous quick read titled Goodnight iPad that could bring a chuckle the next time you see one of your blue-light glowing friends.

If you’re not ready to go cold turkey and find yourself having a hard time being pried away from the phone or tablet, try f.lux. This program can be downloaded to your electronic devices and uses warmer lights instead of blue lights, to help the production of melatonin remain uninterrupted. With this work-around, you may be able to watch episodes of Orange Is the New Black on Netflix, sift through the week’s sports rankings, meander through Pinterest recipes for quinoa, and even pay Microsoft Outlook a visit. Just make sure you and your digital gadgets can say, “Good night.”

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Jul23

Curiosity Taught the Cat

6568523“An endless trail of ideas floats in the ether. You will only see them if you are curious.” I read this in The Eternal Pursuit of Unhappiness book all Ogilvy employees know and love. It got me thinking about curiosity—one of David Ogilvy’s eight habits. Is curiosity an important skill to have in the healthcare communications field?

They say curiosity killed the cat, but I believe curiosity taught the cat (plus, don’t cats have nine lives?). From interning at Ogilvy CommonHealth in the summer of 2014, I can see why curiosity is a must skill to have. In the rapidly changing healthcare field, there are so many aspects to be familiar with. For starters, healthcare reform is constantly changing with new laws and regulations. The pharma market is always evolving with new drugs and medications for patients. Also, the aging population is causing shifts in the demand for certain drugs, devices, and medications. There is always something new you have to keep your eye on in this field, so unless you have the curiosity, you are likely to miss current trends in the healthcare field.

Curiosity as a student

Curiosity helps people grow. In college, I’ve learned that curiosity is best practiced by taking chances. Each semester I believe it is important to take a course that is unrelated to a major or minor. It helps students think outside of the box and get a different understanding about various topics. I’ve noticed that the students who take chances like this in college are the ones who build a well-rounded background.

Curiosity at Ogilvy CommonHealth

I believe being curious is important at Ogilvy CommonHealth too. However, instead of just giving my reasoning, I will share the viewpoints of two others here at Ogilvy:

Jamie Fishman, senior account executive in Payer Marketing, believes we can’t be proactive in this evolving market or even provide value to our clients if we are not curious. There is a difference, however, between being proactive and being curious. Jamie states that questioning or looking into what is known is being proactive, while questioning or looking into what is unknown… that is true curiosity. When we research our clients and understand their industry, we are able to be ahead of the game to serve our clients the best. Jamie stays curious by reading about the work she is involved in and sharing articles with others in order to spark their curiosity. It is no surprise that she believes it is an important skill as well.

Jenita McDaniel, EVP director of operations in Payer Marketing, takes the importance of curiosity a step further. “The people that are curious change the world,” she said, “if our ancestors were not curious, we would not even be here.” It goes to show how brilliant minds are curious. In fact, if our ancestors were not curious, would they have taken risks to explore new life? Would they expand their knowledge to explore the world? Jenita also believes great ideas stem from curiosity; it helps us understand our clients and serve them to the best of our ability. Additionally, Jenita went on to say that curiosity is about taking chances, and those who are curious constantly push the envelope.

I’ll end by sharing a few tips I’ve learned from Jamie and Jenita to help you be more curious:

  1. Read. A lot.
  2. Share what you read with others. Including clients!
  3. Ask questions.
  4. Learn (from any opportunity).
  5. Teach.

I’m sure the more these five tips are practiced, the more curious you’ll become, thus achieving greater results, enhancing intellectual growth, and practicing professionalism.

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Apr8

Mad People…and the Cadillacs That Drive Them

thumbnail BRUNEIt was recently brought to our attention that the “American way” is rooted in a belief that hard work in the pursuit of “stuff” is how we do things…and central to what makes us exceptional. In fact, nothing is (apparently) more foreign to us than the thought of being away from work for more than a week at a time. Can we even conceive of taking the entire month of August off? We might agree that it sounds nice, but we have our priorities straight.

Or do we? When evaluating work/life priorities, ask yourself these questions: “How many vacation days have I banked…and how many will I bank this year?” The truth is there are a lot of folks who find it difficult (or completely impossible) to take all their vacation time and, perhaps even worse, to “unplug” and thoroughly enjoy a hard-earned week away from work. The very nature of our business makes it all too easy for us to justify checking in periodically; but doesn’t this come down to personal choice?

The question of “work-life balance” weighs heavy. It haunts us a little, and taunts us more. Not surprisingly, it’s a question that routinely makes an appearance in our Town Hall meetings…what should be surprising is that so many of us have allowed it to actually be a question. None of us deny the importance of “checking out” or “recharging” (which, oddly enough, sounds like work). So why don’t we take our own advice?

Is the answer found in a TV commercial that has proven brilliant in its well-calculated (or serendipitous) controversy? A commercial that has generated so much chatter precisely because it can be interpreted to equally support—or refute—opposing political and social agendas?

The spot raises some interesting points regarding the value of the American work ethic vs the unseemliness of American consumerism. The fact that it provides a strong argument for both sides makes one wonder: is it a spoof? Is it accurate, something to be proud of? Or is it offensive, the epitome of the “ugly American”? Buried in most discussion lies the question: Will it sell? Time will tell, but at least that brings me back to our world of advertising.

There’s little doubt that agency life as depicted in Mad Men has evolved (we seem to smoke less, at least). But there are some lingering traces of that world that we might not feel so good about. One of which is the work-life balance.

Along with agency politics, financial stress and creative differences, the world of Sterling Cooper etc is largely populated with Mad People. People who never seem to “leave” work. They leave the office (eventually), they go home, and they go out (usually with coworkers); but the office is a constant companion.

In Mad Men, we also see Don Draper’s career arc accentuated by (among other things) the car he drives. When the show opened it was an Oldsmobile…within a few years he’s in a Caddy. As consumerism goes, he is living the American dream…and his work-life balance predictably bottoms out to the left.

Of course, life in America has changed considerably since the ’60s, and the concessions in “quality time” that we make are driven by some newer realities. We’re as interested as ever in collecting our toys, but the cost of a college education (as one example) now applies significant additional financial pressure. And, unlike the ’60s, college is more of a mandate than a privilege—keeping up with the Joneses now absolutely includes college. This and other factors have no doubt influenced the decision by many families to take a 2-income approach, which can create scheduling issues that make it even more challenging to strike a thoroughly satisfying balance in life.

Is the answer as simple as being less driven to succeed? Probably not.

Just as the character in the Cadillac commercial advises us, hard work can get you the stuff that proves you work hard. But the point he, Don Draper—and perhaps too many of us—may be missing is that hard work is most valuable when we make the same commitment to take the time, to enjoy time.

The work will be there when you get back. But you’ll be living the American dream, with just a dash of je ne sais quoi.

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Mar18

Coming Home

welcomeback_ImageIs it a better opportunity? What’s the environment and company philosophy? Is there an overall growth plan? How are the benefits? Would it be better for me and my family? What’s the commute like? What happens if I leave? What happens if I stay? What happens if I leave and I’m not happy—could I come back?

I’m sure you’ve thought about some of these questions and many, many more over the lifetime of your career. You may have even acted upon them one or more times. I don’t have a one-size-fits-all answer or the right answer for you. But what I can tell you is that…“I’m Back.”

Now that you know the ending, let me tell you my journey that brought me back.

I had been with Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide over 3 years. I was happy, but in April 2013 I left to explore a new opportunity. There were pros and cons—there always are—but I missed the people and the work. I missed the laughter and the energy and the passion that bounced off those bold red walls.

Once again, questions flooded my mind. What does it look like if I leave my new job after only 7 months? Will I be happy somewhere else? What will that culture be? Should I consider going back to OCHWW?

Seldom do people think about going back to their previous jobs, or boomeranging; but I was fortunate to have this as an option. After all, I had been happy there and I had a few balls in my court. I had:

  • Left on good terms
  • Gained the respect of my colleagues
  • Made a strong impact while I was there

Those factors served me well and I made the call.

Since I’ve been back, the response has been overwhelming. “You’re back.” “Welcome back.” “It’s great to see you.” “It’s great to have you back.” “We love boomerangers!” I’m now part of that group that has returned home. In the past 6 weeks since I’ve returned, I’ve heard about at least half-a-dozen other boomerangers. Who knew I was part of the in-crowd?

My journey has brought me full circle in less than a year. Each and every situation teaches us something—whether you stay, leave, come back—learn and grow from it.

If you find yourself at a crossroads like I did, try these few suggestions to consider if an opportunity is right for you. Whether it’s internal or external—at some point you’ll need to think long and hard about what to do. So:

  • Make a list of the pros and cons (yes, literally write them down)
  • Talk to trusted family, friends, colleagues—we’ve all been there (be selective, but use your trusted network)
  • Look at the entire picture (salary, benefits, commute, culture, other colleagues who may be there)
  • Educate yourself about the overall company, not just a specific division or job

Try not to:

  • Jump or be reactive
  • Leave because of one unfortunate instance
  • Only focus on one piece of the pie

So wherever your journey takes you (or doesn’t), make the decision that is right for you. Explore, think, don’t jump, and maybe talk to those of us who have come back (there seems to be a trend lately). I don’t have all the answers that would be right for you, but I can let you know that the grass isn’t always greener on the other side—it’s just a different length.

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